8B - 3_ElFldPtlRst.ppt - E Field and Potential Potential...

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E Field and Potential Potential surfaces of dipole A + charge would slide down the potential curve. A - charge would slide up the potential curve.
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Force Derived From (-) Slope of U Curve: Example of a diatomic molecule • F = qE = - q(dV/dr) = - (dU/dr) • Obtain F (vector) from U (scalar) by - slope. • F = 0 where slope = 0 = Equilibrium position
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A View of Potential Energy Fig. 39-17. The potential energy U of a hydrogen atom as a function of the separation r between the electron and the central proton. Energy decreasing toward center means that the force on the electron is toward the proton; e - “falls into the potential well”.
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Potential energy curve for an unbound electronic state of a diatomic molecule If there is no potential minimum, there is no bound state. dU/dr negative F is positive (pushes atoms apart)
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Sample problem Chap. 24, prob. 45 Two electrons are fixed 2.0 cm apart. Another electron is shot from infinity and stops midway between the two. What is its initial speed?
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Solution to Problem 45 Use conservation of mechanical energy. Take the potential energy to be zero when the moving electron is far away from the fixed electrons. The final potential energy is then , where where is the mass of an electron and is the Hence
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Electrodynamics - Moving Charge • Previously E = 0 in conductors; charges did not move.(a) • Now we have a closed circuit with a potential (voltage) across its ends. (b) There is an E field in the conductor and charges MOVE. • The SI unit for current is the coulomb per second, or ampere (A, amp), which is an SI base unit:
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Electric Charge - Compare Water and Electricity Charge (coulombs) (e.g.,
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8B - 3_ElFldPtlRst.ppt - E Field and Potential Potential...

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