PKG101_FS08_Glass_Pkg_1___2

PKG101_FS08_Glass_Pkg_1___2 - Glass Packaging Glass History...

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Unformatted text preview: Glass Packaging Glass History • One of oldest man-made substances – 12,000 bc • Glass beads in Syria • Sailors with soda ash • 7,000 bc Egyptians had glass jewelry – 3,000 bc • Egyptians made glass bottles – Wound glass strands Glass History (Con’t) • 300 bc – First glass blow pipe • Larger containers • More precision & better quality • Better finish – Last part of bottle which was made • 200 bc – Romans made flat glass Glass History (Con’t) • 1608 – Glass manufacturing in Jamestown • 1800’s – I nvention of machines to make containers (25% of glass for containers by 1880) • 1903 “Libby-Owens” – First fully automatic bottle making machine (Owens worked for Libby Company) Glass Definition Glass is an inorganic, non-cr ystalline, br ittle solid that is formed by cooling from a liquid state. I t shows no discontinuous change in properties at any temperature, but becomes more rigid when its temperature decreases and less rigid when its temperature increases. What does it mean to be non-crystalline? • When tiny crystals form in a repeating orderly fashion in a material, the material is said to be crystalline or to have "crystalline regions." – Most metals have a crystalline structure. – • Packaging glass is non-crystalline – Packaging glass does not have a crystalline structure, it is amorphous, made up of random, unordered molecules. What does it mean to be non-crystalline? • Why is this important o Crystalline regions of a glass container are not as clear and are usually weaker than the amorphous sections. o Containers made of crystalline glass are more likely to break (shatter) when shocked, such as by being dropped or "banged around" during transport. o Pressurized containers, such as champagne bottles may literally explode because of the internal pressure. o The milky appearance of a crystalline region obscures the consumer's view of the product. Crystalline vs. Non- crystalline Crystalline Vitreous ( Glassy ) What does it mean to be brittle ? • Brittle materials behave differently than ductile materials. – Ductile materials, which include steel, aluminum, rubber and many plastics, deform gradually under load. – As the load increases, the deformation increases proportionally until it reaches a level of deformation called the plastic limit. • Brittle materials tend to fail in a single, sudden action. • When a brittle material, such as cast iron, ice, or glass, is loaded, there is little observable deformation until the material suddenly fails (breaks). • Brittle materials are usually strong in compression and weak in tension. What does "no discontinuous change at any temperature " mean?...
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This note was uploaded on 02/09/2009 for the course PKG 101 taught by Professor Haroldhughes during the Spring '08 term at Michigan State University.

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PKG101_FS08_Glass_Pkg_1___2 - Glass Packaging Glass History...

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