PKG101_FS08_Intro_to_Pkg_Day_1_Outline

PKG101_FS08_Intro_to_Pkg_Day_1_Outline - Introduction to...

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Introduction to Packaging  
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Packaging? How many of you think about  packaging on a daily basis? How many of you use  packaging on a daily basis? How many of you remember a  package that failed and irritated  you?
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What is a package A package is the enclosure for products,  items or other packages, such as a wrap,  pouch, bag, box, cup, tray, can, tube,  bottle, or other container form, to perform  one or more of the following  four basic  functions : o Containment o Protection o Communication o Utility
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Classification of Packages Primary , the first layer of protection and  containment, plays important role in  communications and utility functions tubes of hand lotion  potato chip bags metal soup cans  envelopes for mail  bread wrappers paint cans
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Classification of Packages Secondary , packages that hold other  packages, performs the communication  function and may influence the utility of  the product/pkg. combination o        Paperboard cartons for tubes or bottles o        paperboard sleeves around plastic packages of  meat o        wrappers to hold 6 or more cans  o        plastic rings that hold cans together o        variety packs of cereal.
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Lockhart’s Packaging Matrix Environment Function Physical Biosphere Human Containment Protection Communication Utility / Convenience
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Containment First – most basic – function        Packages (skins, leaves, intestines, etc.)  were  used to store and carry grain and other  essentials The ABILITY TO HOLD throughout the  package     environment A container vessel, barrier, or structure that  confines a substance within a defined  boundary
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Containment Liquids - Best example How would you transport a gallon of milk  from a store to your home if it was not in a  jug, can, or plastic bottle?  You probably wouldn’t pour it in a pocket!  You  would have to put it in a pail, bag, or some other  container (package). In general, liquids must be contained in a  package to be handled.    
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Free flowing solids Behave like liquids Sugar Salt What about flour?  Is it free flowing? Flour often does not flow because it
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This note was uploaded on 02/09/2009 for the course PKG 101 taught by Professor Haroldhughes during the Spring '08 term at Michigan State University.

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PKG101_FS08_Intro_to_Pkg_Day_1_Outline - Introduction to...

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