humanities - Hubris excessive ambition Beginning in the Archaic period Greek artists began to reproduce human figures naturalistically The metopes on

humanities - Hubris excessive ambition Beginning in the...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 6 pages.

Hubris- excessive ambition Beginning in the Archaic period, Greek artists began to reproduce human figures naturalistically. The metopes on the Parthenon are illustrations of mythological battles. Aeschylus retained an enduring idea that in the end, right would triumph. Werner Heisenberg's discoveries in quantum mechanics were partly inspired by the Atomists The early Iron Age in Greece is sometimes known as the Heroic Age. The scales of Greek music are called modes. The philosopher who discovered the numerical relationship of musical harmonies was Pythagoras. The aulos was a musical instrument Partially because of the influence of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey,  the Iron Age in ancient Greece is also known as the: Heroic Age Very few extant examples of the earliest Greek art remain today;  of the following examples, which has been the best source to help  us understand Iron Age culture? Painted pottery "Thought thinking of itself" was Aristotle's description of the nature of God. The Ionic frieze on the Parthenon depicts a procession of Athenians. Entasis--different distances between (and thickness of) columns, and outward leaning entablature--are carefully designed to create a perfect visual appearance. The eighth century B.C. was crucial to Greek culture because human and animal figures appear in works of art.
In contrast to the Corinthians, the Athenians developed a 7th century pottery style emphasizing events from mythology. Orientalizing refers to a Greek pottery style that uses flower and figure motifs The Parthenon combines Doric order columns and Ionic features. The reigning aesthetic of classical Greece had been order and  idealized mathematical proportions. In the Hellenistic Age that  followed, the main ideas expressed were: Emotion and expressivity Caryatids, used on the Erechtheum, are figures of young women seeming to hold up the weight of the roof.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture