Fiction as History

Fiction as History - B AN 101 6 March 2007 Fiction as...

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B AN 101 6 March 2007 Fiction as History #1 Yuasa’s Kannani provided readers with an incredibly vivid account of young Ryūji’s adaptation into Korean society in the early twentieth century. His assimilation into society was made more difficult in some ways, but yet easier in other ways due to his friendship with the young Korean girl, Kannani. By Yuasa’s use of this friendship between the young children he was able to illustrate to the reader how the Japanese and the Koreans were portrayed in the eyes of each other. Using the innocence of the children, the accounts of Ryūji and Kannani are more genuine and truthful. The story of Kannani begins with both characters not understanding the opposite race, but as it progresses they teach each other to be more accepting and sympathetic towards each race although the favor is not returned to them. They experience several instances where they are harassed for being friends, “Ryuchan and Kannani are totally strange Falling for a Korean slut puts all Japanese to shame” (Yuasa 43). Yuasa portrays
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This note was uploaded on 04/19/2008 for the course AN 101 taught by Professor Edwards during the Spring '07 term at Butler.

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Fiction as History - B AN 101 6 March 2007 Fiction as...

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