BIOS41_Lecture8_01302008

BIOS41_Lecture8_01302008 - replication machine(Figure 6-17...

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BIOS 41 Biology Core I: Cellular and Molecular Spring 2008 Professor J. A. Sands Lecture 8, January 30 DNA Replication (Chapter 6, pages 195-207)
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06_03_own duplication.jpg DNA acts as a template for its own duplication .
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06_04_replic.rounds.jpg DNA replication is “semi-conservative”.
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06_05_replic.origin.jpg DNA synthesis begins at “replication origins”. Replication forks move away in both directions, as shown on next slide .
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06_09_Replic.forks.jpg
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06_10_5prime_3prime.jpg DNA is synthesized in the 5’ to 3’ direction .
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06_12_asymmetrical.jpg DNA replication forks are asymmetrical .
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06_13_polymerase1.jpg During DNA synthesis, DNA polymerase proofreads its own work .
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06_14_polymerase2.jpg DNA polymerase contains separate sites for synthesis and editing .
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06_16_lagging strand.jpg On the lagging strand, DNA is synthesized in fragments .
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Proteins at a replication fork cooperate to form a
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Unformatted text preview: replication machine (Figure 6-17). “Most of the proteins involved in DNA replication are thought to be held together in a large multienzyme complex that moves as a unit along the DNA, enabling DNA to be synthesized on both strands in a coordinated manner.” “This complex can be likened to a tiny sewing machine composed of protein parts and powered by nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis.” “Although the structures of the individual protein components of the replication machine have been determined, how these components fit together is not known in detail.” “Some ideas about the general appearance of the complex, however, have been proposed (Figure 6-17B).” Essential Cell Biology , pages 206 & 207 06_17_group proteins.jpg Replication fork machine ....
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BIOS41_Lecture8_01302008 - replication machine(Figure 6-17...

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