BIOS41_Lecture21_03172008

BIOS41_Lecture21_03172008 - center in animal cells....

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BIOS 41 Biology Core I: Cellular and Molecular Spring 2008 Professor J. A. Sands Lecture 21, March 17 Cellular Cytoskeleton (Chapter 17, pages 573-592)
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17_01_cytoskeleton.jpg The cytoskeleton gives a cell its shape and allows the cell to organize its internal components. Shown here is a skin cell in culture, stained with Coomassie Blue, a general protein stain.
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17_02_01_protein_filament.jpg
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17_02_02_protein_filament.jpg
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17_02_03_protein_filament.jpg
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17_05_strengthen_cells.jpg Intermediate filaments strengthen animal cells.
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17_08_nuclear envelope.jpg Intermediate filaments support and strengthen the nuclear envelope.
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17_09_Microtubules.jpg Microtubules usually grow out of an organizing structure, such as a centrosome, spindle pole, or basal body.
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17_10_tubes_tubulin.jpg Microtubules are hollow tubes with structurally distinct ends.
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17_11_centrosome.jpg The centrosome is the major microtubule-organizing
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Unformatted text preview: center in animal cells. 17_12_grows_shrinks.jpg The array of microtubules anchored in a centrosome is continually changing as microtubules grow and shrink. Dynamic Instability 17_14_polarize_cell.jpg The selective stabilization of microtubules can polarize a cell. 17_15_nerve_cell_axon.jpg In nerve cells, the microtubules in the axon all point in the same direction and serve as tracks for the directional transport of materials. 17_17globular heads.jpg Motor proteins, which drive intracellular transport, move along microtubules using their globular heads. ATP-dependent walking along a microtubule. The tail of a motor protein generally binds stably to some cell component, such as a vesicle or an organelle, and thereby determines the type of cargo that the motor protein can transport....
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BIOS41_Lecture21_03172008 - center in animal cells....

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