BIOS41_Lecture3_01182008

BIOS41_Lecture3_01182008 - Molecules that are non-polar and...

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BIOS 41 Biology Core I: Cellular and Molecular Spring 2008 Professor J. A. Sands Lecture 3, January 18 Chemical Components of Cells (Chapter 2, pages 39-55)
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Carbon and Hydrogen atoms, with atomic weights 12 and 1.
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Covalent bonds form by the sharing of electrons .
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Covalent bonds have particular geometries.
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C-C double bonds are shorter and more rigid than single C-C bonds.
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In polar covalent bonds, the electrons are shared unequally. Page 48: Water is held together by “hydrogen bonds” (electrical attraction between the positive and negative regions of adjacent water molecules). Molecules that are polar or carry charges dissolve readily in water (they are “hydrophilic”).
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Unformatted text preview: Molecules that are non-polar and not charged do not dissolve in water (they are hydrophobic). Proteins can bind to one another via complementary charge distributions. Protons are on the move in aqueous solutions. Pure water: pH = 7 Cells contain four major families of small organic molecules. They are the building blocks for the macromolecules of the cell. Structure of glucose. Fatty acids have both hydrophobic and hydrophilic components. The properties of fats depend on the fatty acid side chains they carry . For example, butter compared to corn oil. Phospholipids aggregate to form cell membranes....
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BIOS41_Lecture3_01182008 - Molecules that are non-polar and...

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