Estonia became a full member of the European Union on May 1

Estonia became a full member of the European Union on May 1...

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Estonia's government does not screen foreign investments. It does, however, establish requirements for certain sectors. These requirements are not intended to restrict foreign ownership but rather to regulate it and establish clear ownership responsibilities. Licenses are required for a foreign investor to become involved in: mining, energy, gas and water supply, railroad and transport, waterways, ports, dams and other water-related structures, and telecommunications and communication networks. The Estonian Central Bank issues licenses for foreign interests seeking to invest in or establish a bank. Government review and licensing have proven to be routine and non-discriminatory. Estonia's openness to foreign direct investment extended to its privatization program, which is now complete. Only a small number of enterprises -- the country's main port, the power plants, the postal system, and the national lottery -- remain state- owned. Sound and liberal economic policies and an excellent business climate have ensured strong levels of foreign direct investment (FDI) in Estonia. During the last decade Estonia has been one of the leading countries in Central and Eastern Europe in terms of inward investment per capita.
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Estonia became a full member of the European Union on May 1...

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