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Soc_2070_class_2 - Soc 2070 Problems in Contemporary...

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Soc 2070: Problems in Contemporary Society Poverty and income inequality Tuesday, September, 2nd, 2008
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Announcements Course packet was out of print. Please pre-order your copy. 2 nd midterm is NOT during Thanksgiving. Download the new syllabus from Blackboard The midterms are in class. Using the e-journals section of the library homepage.
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What is poverty? History: “deserving and undeserving poor” Poverty had individual causes (“character”; “laziness”), not social Idle and unemployed bound as indentured servants Children and the elderly were helped International comparisons $1 or $2 dollars a day ($1095 or $2190 per year for a family of 4)
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General views of poverty General social survey 1993. “What amount of weekly income would you use for a family of four?” People’s answers ranged from $25 a week to $1500. Average was $341.
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How to define poverty? Basic concept in the literature: Economic or material deprivation: lack of economic resources. Inadequate resources to obtain basic living needs: food, clothing and shelter.
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Measuring poverty Material measures of poverty and hardship Hunger Lack of housing, healthcare, heating Measures of poverty Relative Absolute
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Absolute measures Definition: AM have thresholds that remain constant over time.
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