Whooping Crane Report

Whooping Crane Report - Recovery Act of Whooping Cranes...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Recovery Act of Whooping Cranes Whooping Crane Grus Americana
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Whooping Crane is an endangered North American bird. It has been endangered in the United States by the Fish and Wildlife Services since 1970 and in Canada since 1978 (Johns, Brian et al, 2005). There are many reasons for the endangerment of the species including predation, and hunting (Johns, Brian et al, 2005). The Fish & Wildlife Services created a recovery plan in order to build more captive zones for these endangered species to live so that they have a better chance of survival as a species, as well as hope to get off the endangered species list (Johns, Brian et al, 2005). This bird is classified by the system of taxonomy under the Kingdom Animalia, Phylum Chordata, Class Aves, Order Gruiformes, Family Gruidae, and then the Genus and Species Grus americana (Johns, Brian et al, 2005). The different classifications for the whooping crane show that the bird is a vertebrate, crane-like bird (Johns, Brian et al, 2005). The whooping crane is a crane-like bird most similarly related to the sandhill cranes (Johns, Brian et al, 2005). Whooping cranes are known most for their recurring sounds when they are panicked. The noise makes a “whooping” noise, hence the name “whooping” crane (Johns, Brian et al, 2005). The bird stands almost five feet tall, and most usually the adult male is larger than the adult female, at about 16 pounds compared to the female’s 14 pounds (Johns, Brian et al, 2005). The birds are mostly white, except for the yellowish, reddish and blackish coloring around the head, the grayish feet and the black wings. Although the wings are black, the black feathers are only visible during flight because they are underneath the wings (Johns, Brian et al, 2005). This makes the birds very noticeable during migration. At about three months, the chick is able to begin flight and soon after the feathers begin developing around the head and back (Johns, Brian et al, 2005). Although these cranes are an endangered species, those who do stay
Background image of page 2
alive, live for a long time. There are records according to the FWS of a reproductive male crane aged 38. The average age for these cranes is about 25 years old (Johns, Brian et al, 2005). This endangered species is known very well for its’ migration patterns throughout
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course BIOL 102L taught by Professor Duggins during the Spring '07 term at South Carolina.

Page1 / 9

Whooping Crane Report - Recovery Act of Whooping Cranes...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online