 Calculate the following red cell indices, and explain...

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Chemistry for Today: General, Organic, and Biochemistry
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Chapter 23 / Exercise 23.73
Chemistry for Today: General, Organic, and Biochemistry
Seager/Slabaugh
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HEMATOLOGY (Martini p. 652-664, 666-672) Work in pairs Objectives: For each of the following blood tests, outline the procedure, state the normal values and the significance of deviations from normal: red cell count hemoglobin level (gm per 100 ml) packed cell volume (hematocrit) total white cell count white cell differential count Calculate the following red cell indices, and explain the significance of deviations from their normal values: MCV (mean cell volume) MCHC (mean cell hemoglobin concentration) MCH (mean cell hemoglobin) Describe the ABO and Rh blood group system Discuss the significance of blood groups in blood transfusion and pregnancy.
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Chemistry for Today: General, Organic, and Biochemistry
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Chapter 23 / Exercise 23.73
Chemistry for Today: General, Organic, and Biochemistry
Seager/Slabaugh
Expert Verified
2 oxygen carrying capacity of the blood. Any reduction in the total amount of hemoglobin in the blood is known as anemia . Polycythemia is an abnormally high level of red blood cells. In some cases it occurs as a result of increased erythropoietin release stimulated by hypoxemia due to high altitude (where the oxygen content of the air is reduced), or by heart failure or pulmonary disease when oxygen delivery to the tissues is below normal. I. RED BLOOD CELL COUNT (RBC COUNT) To conduct a red blood cell count, you will dilute a known volume of blood with a fluid that prevents coagulation and then place the mixture into a counting chamber of known volume: a hemocytometer . There are so many red blood cells in the blood that it would be impossible to count them in pure blood: dilutions have to be made to decrease their number. The cells are then counted by microscopic inspection, and

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