ch09 - Chapter 9 Membranes and Membrane Transport Chapter 9 Membranes and Membrane Transport ChapterOutline Membranefunctions Signaltransductioni

ch09 - Chapter 9 Membranes and Membrane Transport Chapter 9...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 17 pages.

Chapter 9 . Membranes and Membrane Transport Chapter 9 Membranes and Membrane Transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter Outline Membrane functions: Boundary for cell and organelle Surface on which reactions can occur Regulation of material flux through membrane proteins Signal transduction interface Specialized properties: Photosynthesis, electron transport, electrical activity Membrane components Lipids: Amphipathic molecules arranged as bilayers with polar groups out and nonpolar  groups in Proteins: Surface associated or embedded in bilayer Plasma membrane Delimits cell Excludes and retains certain ions and molecules Major role in energy transduction Cell locomotion Reproduction Signal transduction Interactions with other cells or extracellular matrix Lipid interactions Monolayers: Formation of single-molecule-thick layer at air/water interface with polar  groups in contact with water Micelles: Lipid spheres with polar groups out and hydrophobic tails in the center:  Critical micelle concentration is the concentration of amphiphilic compound at which  micelles form Lipid bilayer: Two lipid monolayers with hydrophobic surfaces face to face Liposomes: Vesicles formed by lipid bilayers Fluid mosaic model Singer and Nicholson, 1972 Phospholipid bilayer forming fluid matrix Two classes of membrane proteins Peripheral (extrinsic) proteins Associated with bilayer surface via ionic interactions and H bonds Extractable with high salt or agents that disrupt H bonds (urea) Integral (intrinsic) proteins Associate with hydrophobic bilayer interior via hydrophobic  interactions Extractable with detergents Membrane mobility 126
Chapter 9 . Membranes and Membrane Transport Protein Frye and Edidin, 1970: Lateral movement of membrane proteins following  fusion of mouse and human cells Lateral movement may be impeded by interactions with cytoskeleton Lipids Rapid lateral movement Slow transverse movement Membrane asymmetry Lateral asymmetry arises from clustering of membrane components within the plane Lipid clustering: Phase separation induced by divalent cations and influenced  by lipid type Protein clustering: Self-associating membrane proteins e.g., bacteriorhodopsin Transverse asymmetry Lipids: Lipid asymmetry due to two processes Asymmetric synthesis Energy-dependent transport: Flippases Proteins: Asymmetric molecules Carbohydrates: Glycoproteins and glycolipids on outer surface Membrane phase transitions: Radical change in physical state occurring within narrow range of  transition (or melting) temperature.  Below T m Lipids close-pack: Lose lateral mobility and rotational mobility of fatty acid chains Consequences: Membrane thickens and decreases surface area Characteristics T m  increases with chain length degree of saturation and is influenced by nature  of head group Pure phospholipid bilayers show narrow temperature range

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture