Ch 27 Relevant Concept Questions

Ch 27 Relevant Concept Questions - University Physics Young...

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University Physics Young and Freedman Chapter 27 Concept Questions and solutions Chapter 27: Pre-Chapter Question Q: Why do charged solar particles move predominantly toward the earth's poles rather than the equator? A: Charged particles are deflected if they move perpendicular to the earth's magnetic field, but can easily move either along the magnetic field's direction or opposite to it. These “easy” directions naturally lead the particles toward the earth's north and south magnetic poles. 1. Suppose you cut off the part of the compass needle shown in Fig. 27.5a that is painted white. You discard this part, drill a hole in the remaining red part, and place the red part on the pivot at the center of the compass. Will the red part still swing east and west when a current is applied as in Figs. 27.5b and 27.5c? Yes. When a magnet is cut apart, each part has a north and south pole. Hence the small red part behaves much like the original, full-sized compass needle. 2. If the magnetic field in Example 27.1 were in the positive x-direction, with all other quantities the same, what would be the force on the proton? What if the velocity were in the positive y-direction, with all other quantities the same as in Example 27.1?
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course PHYS 0030 taught by Professor Cutts during the Spring '07 term at Brown.

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Ch 27 Relevant Concept Questions - University Physics Young...

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