Chapter 7 - Chapter 7 Literacy Disorders in Children...

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Chapter 7: Literacy Disorders in Children Introduction: Speech language pathologist work with cognition and cognitive disorders. Literacy (reading, writing): ability to communicate through written language, both reading and writing. Speech language pathologist are communication specialist (both normal and impaired communication) and that reading and writing are essential components of communication. Reading and writing are extensions of a child’s auditory perception, receptive language and verbal expressive language skills. Use to be assumed that reading disorders were primarily caused by visual perceptual deficit Reading and writing are language-based activities; language delays, disorders or both can contribute to or cause literacy problems The Differences between Learning to Understand Speech and Learning to Read: Auditory perceptual system is biologically adapted to process spoken words versus visual system is not biologically adapted to process written words. Learning to read requires knowledge of the phonological system of language; sounds (phonemes) that correspond with the letters (graphemes) in the alphabet. (more sounds than letters in English alphabet) learning to read is taught versus learning to talk is caught Interrelationship among hearing, phonological processing, reading, and dyslexia exists. the brain’s auditory and visual system are interconnected by complex pathway of nerve fibers. 50% or more of children with language impairments in pre-school or kinder go on to have reading disabilities in 1 st or 2 nd grade and 20% of these children are classified as poor readers Emergent Literacy/Pre-literacy Period (Birth-Kindergarten) Emergent literacy skills: early skills developed in the preschool years that precede or are presumed prerequisites for later developing reading and writing skills. Through shared book reading, children begin to learn the names of letters, their shapes and the sounds they make Alphabetic principle: letters and combinations of letters represent speech sounds; speech can turn into print and print can be turned into speech Skills that consistently and most strongly relate to literacy achievement: Phonological awareness- sensitivity to the sound structure of spoken language Oral language- grammatical, lexical, and narrative abilities Alphabet knowledge- receptive and expressive knowledge of the individuals letters and alphabet
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Concepts about print: knowledge of the rules governing how print is used and organized various genres, including books and general print in the home and community (e.g. labels on boxes, newspaper, and billboards) Name writing: representation of one’s own name in print Scaffolding: support that adults provide to children for them to achieve competence in an activity (e.g.
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  • Spring '16
  • Spencer
  • Auditory Processing Disorder, cognitive disorders, sans­serif, Context of Speech and Language Therapy

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