Strip Patterns Final

Strip Patterns Final - Emily Blum M330 Final #2 Strip...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Emily Blum M330 Final #2 Strip Patterns Mathematics focuses on the study of patterns, some of which are found often in  nature. With observing these natural patterns, we can see how nature’s process has  adapted and been utilized by humans. Mathematicians describe an object’s symmetry,  or balance, by considering the idea of isometry or rigid motion. Rigid motions are a  means of describing symmetry; symmetries are the rigid motions resulting in a figure  indistinguishable   from   the   original.   A   rigid   motion   is   defined   as   a   transformation  consisting   of   rotations,   reflections,   and   translations   leaving   a   given   arrangement  unchanged. Such a motion is a transformation in space or within the plane where the  original figure is congruent to the new image. The four types of rigid motions are  reflection, rotation, translation and, glide reflection. Symmetry involves the set of rules that mathematically describe the shape of  an object; with the two most common forms being reflection, or mirror symmetry, and  rotation symmetry. Reflection is when two halves of an object are mirror images of each  other. Some alphabetical examples would be the uppercase letters A, U, V, T, and Y, all  having reflection symmetry across a vertical line; and the letters D, E, C, and B, all  1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
having   reflection   symmetry   across   a   horizontal   plane.   The   following   figures   have  reflection symmetry. Mirror Plane | | //|\\ (|) Mirror )) ] p q d b / Mirror //]|[\\ / | \ Plane ---------------- Plane -------+------- ] | [ )) ] b d q p \ \\]|[// q | p \\|// =|= | Mirror Plane Reflection symmetry in multiple directions is also possible, the letters H, I, O, and X all  have both horizontal and vertical mirror symmetry. It is important to keep in mind that  objects can have multiple types of symmetry, and if they do, the symmetries must be  consistent; mirror planes, aside from circles, can not cross at awkward angles.  Repeated   patterns   being   applied   to   the   original   shape   add   new   steps   for  reflection and rotation; each of these steps is most understood as a translation. When  considering a one-dimensional line, a simple translation of a point along the line is one  of the options available,  ---x-----x-----x-----x-----x-----x-----x-----x-----x--- , 2
Background image of page 2
as is its repetition with a reflection, or a half-turn rotation; in this circumstance, these two  options have identical outcomes due to the point having an infinite number of possible  reflection or rotation points. ---x-x---x-x---x-x---x-x---x-x---x-x---x-x---x-x---x-x- ,
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 11

Strip Patterns Final - Emily Blum M330 Final #2 Strip...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online