{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

PEch.2briefnotes - Chapter 2 Personal Stress Management...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 2 Personal Stress Management What is Stress? An external force that causes a person to become tense or upset, the physical  response of the body to various demands.   “the nonspecific response of the body to any demand made upon it.” o the body reacts to  stressors  - the things that upset or excite us - in the  same way, regardless of whether they are positive or negative.  Stress can be acute, episodic, or chronic, depending on the nature of the  stressors or external events that cause the stress response.  o Acute or short-term stressors can range from a pop quiz to a bomb threat  in a crowded stadium and trigger a brief but intense response to a  specific incident.  o Episodic stressors like monthly bills or mid-term and final exams cause  regular but intermittent elevations in stress levels.  o Chronic stressors include everything from rush-hour traffic to a learning  disability to living with an alcoholic parent or spouse.  Not all stressors are negative.  o Selye coined the term  eustress  for positive stress in our lives  o Distress  refers to the negative effects of stress that can deplete or even  destroy life energy.  General adaptation syndrome (GAS) , developed by Hans Selye. o Our bodies constantly strive to maintain a stable and consistent  physiological state, called  homeostasis o Stressors, whether in the form of physical illness or a demanding job,  disturb this state and trigger a non-specific physiological response.  o The body attempts to restore homeostasis by means of an  adaptive  response consists of three distinct stages: 1. Alarm.  When a stressor first occurs, the body responds with changes that temporarily  lower resistance. Levels of certain hormones may rise; blood pressure may increase  (see Figure 2-1) page 30. The body quickly makes internal adjustments to cope with  the stressor and return to normal activity. 2. Resistance.  If the stressor continues, the body mobilizes its internal resources to try to  sustain homeostasis. For example, if someone you love is seriously hurt in an  accident, you initially respond intensely and feel great anxiety. During the subsequent  stressful period of recuperation, you struggle to carry on as normally as possible, but  this requires considerable effort.  3. Exhaustion.  If the stress continues long enough, you usually cannot keep up your  normal functioning. Even a small amount of additional stress at this point can cause a  breakdown.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}