220_EcosystemEcology_07

220_EcosystemEcology_07 - Ecosystem Ecology Ecosystem...

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cosystem Ecology Ecosystem Ecology cosystem ecology emphasizes energy Ecosystem ecology emphasizes energy flow and chemical cycling. • An ecosystem consists of all of the organisms in a community as well as the abiotic components they interact with.
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cosystems and physical laws Ecosystems and physical laws •E c o s ystems follow established physical laws. yp y • Energy can neither be created nor destroyed it can only be converted from one form to another. • The amount of entropy (or disorder) in a system increases (i.e at every step in energy conversion ome energy is dissipated as heat which is not some energy is dissipated as heat, which is not available for work).
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Energy from the sun underpins global ecosystems he Earth is not a closed system Energy The Earth is not a closed system. Energy comes in from outside (i.e. from the sun), oves through ecosystems and ultimately moves through ecosystems and ultimately is dissipated into space as heat.
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utrients Nutrients nlike energy nutrients are constantly Unlike energy, nutrients are constantly recycled from one form to another and ass through multiple trophic levels to pass through multiple trophic levels to decomposers to abiotic forms and back to ing organisms again living organisms again.
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cosystem ecologists deal with large- cale Ecosystem ecologists deal with large scale processes and so group organisms into broad classes (primary producers [e.g. plants, primary consumers [e.g. grazing animals], etc.). • Detritivores (or decomposers) are a group of major interest to ecosystem ecologists as these break down non-living organic material (e.g., dead leaves, wood, carrion) releasing their omponents components.
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etritivores Detritivores ain decomposers are fungi and bacteria. Main decomposers are fungi and bacteria. These break down organic matter and release chemical elements into the soil, water and air where producers can recycle them into organic compounds. • Without the action of decomposers life would cease because essential nutrients would remain locked up in detritus and unavailable to rganisms organisms.
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Fungal decomposition of a tree stump
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rimary Production Primary Production bout 1% of the visible light that strikes About 1% of the visible light that strikes earth is converted by photosynthesis into hemical energy chemical energy. • This is enough energy to create about 170 billion tons of organic matter annually.
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Gross and net primary productivity an ecosystem ross primary In an ecosystem gross primary productivity ( GPP ) is the amount of light energy converted into chemical energy per unit time. Net primary productivity ( NPP ) is gross primary productivity minus the energy used by the primary producers for respiration.
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et primary productivity Net primary productivity et primary productivity indicates how Net primary productivity indicates how much energy is available for use by other ophic levels trophic levels.
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This note was uploaded on 02/26/2008 for the course SOCR 220 taught by Professor Kelly,martin during the Fall '07 term at Colorado State.

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220_EcosystemEcology_07 - Ecosystem Ecology Ecosystem...

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