PoliSci Notes

PoliSci Notes - !CH. 1,2,6,8,10 Types of questions o o o o...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
!CH. 1 , 2 ,6,8,10 Types of questions o Time-bound question: Not important in the long-term o Perennial question: Recurring question o We talk about time-bound questions in political science o Federalist Papers address perennial questions o Time-bound and perennial questions are related Perennial o Are we fallen creatures? If humans were perfect, how would it affect laws? Would government even be necessary? If humans aren’t perfect now, but are perfectable? Would government be trying to perfect people? o Do we transcend the material world? o Are we, by nature, social, and to what extent? The Republican Tradition o What is a republic? The form of government in which the people at large- or some substantial portion of the citizens at large- holds in its own hands the reins of power and responsibility o Origin of the Republican Tradition Greek city states
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Small scale urban society known as a Polis o Aspects of the Republican Tradition Self-Government Direct control Rotation Representation Community Individual finds his moral end in the community Dedication to the good of the whole Common good Shared Values Genuine homogeneity of inhabitants o Religious beliefs o Education o Family Habits o Economic status o Same life experiences All combining to form an authentic sense of brotherhood Virtue Most important aspect of republican tradition o Maintains stability
Background image of page 2
Virtue: Love of self-sacrifice o Where is liberty? No personal liberty Republican liberty= the liberty of participating in self- government Enlightenment Tradition o John Locke o State of Nature 3 Characteristics of man Free o Naturally free Equal o Naturally equal, but not exactly o Most important Independent Natural Right to Property Life Liberty Estate Inconvenient or miserable? Inconvenient
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
o If someone finds an apple tree first, the second person will just find something else to eat Miserable o People are always going around fighting and killing each other o Social Contract Ends State of Nature Unanimous consent required Government Formed by civil society using majority rule Goals of Government o Protect Property (i.e. life, liberty, and estate) 3 Points o Government is based on individual consent Government is made for the benefit of the individual o Limited Goals of Government Protect life, liberty, and estate o Implicit Limits on Virtue Estate Liberty Life Two Problems
Background image of page 4
Two problems that the founders faced when creating the Constitution in 1787 The Problem of Constitutional Government (Constitutionalism) o Essentially the problem of protecting people from government The government has authority over the private sphere o Why do we need government? Why not absolute government?
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course POSI 2310 taught by Professor Seigler during the Spring '08 term at Texas State.

Page1 / 24

PoliSci Notes - !CH. 1,2,6,8,10 Types of questions o o o o...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online