Cotton Mather - Nicholas Alley Professor Martin English...

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Unformatted text preview: Nicholas Alley Professor Martin English 2327 S02 September 12, 2005 Conceptions of evil The view of evil seemed to be different in both of stories. In the first one, The Wonder of the Invisible World , the forces of evil seemed to be directly from the devil and maybe some from people. Blame for things are placed on evil, and even a little tiny bit on human nature. In the second story, Pillars of Salt , the source of evil seemed to be from the free will of one person. The blame in put on the person and free will. In The wonders of the Invisible World , the devil perceived that he should have the utmost parts of the earth for His position. Because of this, he sends the witches to[drive] a trade of commissioning their confederate spirits to do all sorts of mischief to the neighborhoods. Since the story is talking about the Salem Witch Trials, I assume the devil is a metaphor for the townspeople that accused the other people in town for being witches. From what I understand about the actual trials, there was no real reason from accusing someone of witchcraft other than dislike for the person. Evil is viewed as accusing someone of witchcraft other than dislike for the person....
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course ENGL 1302 taught by Professor Gilleylen during the Spring '08 term at Collin College.

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Cotton Mather - Nicholas Alley Professor Martin English...

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