Craft syllabus 305_420 Spring 2008

Craft syllabus 305_420 Spring 2008 - 1 Dr. Alison J. Bruey...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 Dr. Alison J. Bruey Department of History, University of North Florida HIS3051, Spring 2008 Time: Tuesday and Thursday, 3:05-4:20pm Place: Building 10, Room 2411 Office Hours: Tuesday 1:00-3:00, Thursday 1:00-3:00 or by appointment Office: Building 8, Room 2341 Email: alison.bruey@unf.edu Office phone: 620-2963 Craft of the Historian Course Description Craft of the Historian is an upper-division research methods course designed to teach history majors how to research and write history papers and to introduce students to history as an academic discipline. Students will receive an intensive introduction to principles and methods of historical analysis, which they will apply in practice as they write an in-depth research paper on their chosen topic of inquiry. Research papers will be based on extensive examination of primary and secondary sources. This course is designed to enhance students' critical thinking and analytical capabilities, their academic writing skills, and their understanding of the nature of historians' work. Course Objectives The student who successfully completes this course will have acquired and demonstrated increased knowledge and understanding of history as an academic discipline and the nature of historians' work. The student will have produced a series of essays that correspond to distinct portions of the research process, culminating in a final research paper on a historical research question of his or her choice. The successful students' final papers will have demonstrated an ability to analyze and interpret historiography, and both primary and secondary sources. Throughout the semester the successful student will have expressed his or her analyses and arguments in a professional manner and in a written format appropriate to the discipline. **It is important for students to individually discuss their projects and progress with me on a regular basis throughout the term** upperresearch **This is not a basic writing skills class. It is an upper-division historical research methods seminar for which you will do a great deal of writing. As a result, poor basic writing skills may compromise your grade. If you have difficulty with basic writing 2 skills, such as grammar, spelling, syntax, paragraph structure, and expository essay organization, you should acquire a writing tutor. Free tutoring is available at ACE.** Required Readings Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, 7th Edition (University of Chicago Press, 2007). Edward Hallett Carr, What is History? (Vintage, 1961) Michel-Rolph Trouillot, Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History (Beacon, 1995). Mark M. Smith, Stono: Documenting and Interpreting a Southern Slave Revolt (University of South Carolina Press, 2005). Greg Grandin, The Last Colonial Massacre: Latin America in the Cold War (University of Chicago Press: 2004). Readings on Blackboard (BB) Requirements and Grading Class Attendance and Participation Prcis (due the class before your Oral Presentation) Bibliography Oral Presentation Short Book Review Book Review Critical Analysis Paper Primary-Source Analysis Paper Final Paper 10% 5% 5% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10% 30% Grading will be on the plus-minus system. I do not grade on a curve. 100-93 A; 92-90 A89-88 B+; 87-83 B; 82-80 B79-78 C+; 77-73 C 72-60 D; 59 and below, F Academic dishonesty, including plagiarism, will result in an F for the entire course. Example Topics What was revolutionary about the American Revolution? Will the real Christopher Columbus please stand up? Take Notice Attendance: Attendance is required. If you know you must miss a class for a legitimate medical or work-related reason, you may apply for an excused absence by supplying official documentation in advance (e.g. a doctor's note, a written memo 3 from your work supervisor, a written document from military authorities, a signed note from athletic coach, etc.). If a last-minute emergency causes you to miss a class, inform me as soon as possible by email or by leaving a message on my office voice mail. Official documentation will be necessary (e.g. see above, also tow truck or emergency room receipts, police report, etc.). If you will be missing class because of religious observances, notify me in writing during the first week of class. Class participation: Attendance alone does not constitute class participation. If you experience difficulty speaking up in class, see me to plan strategies to help you overcome this problem. Accommodations: Students who require personal accommodations must contact the Disability Resource Center (DRC). Individual accommodations (for exams, interpreters, note-takers, etc.) can only be provided through the DRC. Decorum: You are expected to respect the people who share the classroom with you, and this will be included in your participation and attendance grade. Appropriate decorum includes attentiveness and cooperation in the classroom; arriving on time and not leaving early; paying full attention during class; and engaging in discussions in a respectful and thoughtful manner. Discourteous and disruptive behavior will not be tolerated and may result in expulsion from the course. Cell phones and Pagers: Turn off your cell phones, blackberries, pagers etc. during class, except in cases of emergency. Laptops: In the past students have complained of the clicking noise that their classmates make while typing notes on laptops during class. For this reason, no laptops are to be used in class, unless arranged through the DRC. Recording: No audio or visual recording of any kind, in any format, is allowed at any time in this class unless arranged through the DRC. Academic Dishonesty: Academic dishonesty (cheating, plagiarism, etc.) will earn you an F for the entire course and may be reported to the student conduct board. If you aren't sure whether or not you should cite something, cite it. For more information, see Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses and Dissertations, 7th edition (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007), section 7.9. "Guard Against Inadvertent Plagiarism." See also the AHA's information on plagiarism, at: http://www.historians.org/pubs/Free/ProfessionalStandards.cfm. See also the History Department's policy on plagiarism, at http://www.unf.edu/%7Eclifford/ca/ca1.html. 4 Late work: The penalty for late work is one full letter grade per day late. If you turn the paper in two hours late on the day it was due, it is considered to be one day late. Written assignments: I accept hard copy only. Make sure you arrange to hand in a hard copy by the due date/time. Electronic submissions are not accepted. Sending an electronic submission is the same as not submitting anything. Presentations: If you miss class on a day that you are scheduled to present, you receive an F (zero) for that presentation. If a last-minute emergency causes you to miss a class, inform me as soon as possible by email or by leaving a message on my office voice mail. Official documentation will be necessary to petition for a make-up assignment (e.g. doctor's note, a written memo from your work supervisor, a written document from military authorities, a signed note from athletic coach, tow truck or emergency room receipts, police report, etc.). Blackboard: blackboard.unf.edu. Make sure you register your daily email account with ITS in order to receive class-related email via Blackboard. You must have your UNF mail routed to the email account that you actually use. I will only send email to UNF accounts, and you are responsible for the information contained in those emails. Forwarding does not always work, so the best strategy is to check your UNF account. In Blackboard you will find on-line course readings, the syllabus, announcements and other materials. You should check the site daily for announcements, and weekly to acquire readings. of Welcome to Craft of the Historian Tuesday, January 8: Introduction 8: Thursday, January 10: Introduction, continued; and Bibliography, Footnotes, and 10: Notetaking Reading: BB. AHA Statement on Plagiarism Turabian, pp. 77-80, sections 7.9, 7.9.2, 7.9.3, 7.9.4, and 7.10; pp. 133-140. **We will be using "Bibliography Style" for this class, see Turabian, pg. 136, 15.3.1 for a summary and basic example** **Bring Turabian to class today** **Due at the beginning of class: Paragraph identifying the historical research question will you will research this semester** 5 Tuesday, January 15: Library Orientation Meet in the library, 2nd floor, Room 2102A Reading: BB. Selection from The Information-Literate Historian, "Historians and the Research Process: Getting Started." Thursday, January 17: What is History? Reading: BB. Appleby, Hunt and Jacob, "Introduction" Carr, "Chapter I: The Historian and His Facts," "Chapter II: Society and the Individual." 10**Due at the beginning of class: Bibliography, with 10-12 secondary sources and at five least five primary sources, formatted correctly (use Turabian for reference)** Tuesday, January 22: Categories of Analysis 22: Readings: BB. Burke, "History From Below," "Women's History," and "Environmental History." Thursday, January 24: Identifying the Arguments 24: Arguments Readings: BB. Ian Steele, Shawnee Origins of their Seven Years' War Tuesday, January 29: Discussion of The Last Colonial Massacre 29: Readings: Greg Grandin, The Last Colonial Massacre: Latin America in the Cold War BB. Book review of Grandin TBA **Due at the beginning of class: Short Book Review** Thursday, January 31: Finding Primary Sources and Student Presentations (1) 31: Readings: BB. Selections from The Information-Literate Historian. Primary Sources Burke, "Oral History," and "Visual History" Tuesday, February 5: Workshop One 5: **Due at the beginning of class: Book Review Drafts. Bring a copy for each person in your workshop group** Thursday, February 7: Student Presentations (3) **Due at the beginning of class: Book Reviews** 6 Tuesday, February 12: Writing and Interpretations I 12: Writing Readings: Carr, "Chapter III: History, Science and Morality" BB. Bloch, "Historical Observation," and "Historical Criticism" Thursday, February 14: : Writing and Interpretations II Readings (in the following order): 1) Carr, "Chapter IV: Causation in History." 2) BB. Bloch, "Historical Analysis" 3) BB. John Lewis Gaddis, "Causation, Contingency and Counterfactuals," in The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past. 4) BB. Burke, "Overture. The New History: Its Past and its Future" Tuesday, February 19: The French Revolution and Competing Histories of America: A Historiographical Overview Historiographical Readings: BB. William Doyle, "The Classic Interpretation" and "Revisionism," in The French Revolution. BB. Joyce Applebee, Lynn Hunt and Margaret Jacob, "Competing Histories of America," in Telling the Truth About History Thursday, February 21: Student Presentations (3) 21: Tuesday, February 26: Workshop Two 26: Draft. **Due at the beginning of class: Critical Review Draft. Bring a copy for each person in your workshop group.** Thursday, February 28: Student Presentations (3) Thursday, 28: **Due at the beginning of class: Critical Review Paper** Tuesday, March 4: Student Presentations (3) Thursday, March 6: Working With Primary Sources I 6: Reading: Mark M. Smith, Stono: Documenting and Interpreting a Southern Slave Revolt Tuesday, March 11: Working With Primary Sources II 11: Readings: Mark M. Smith, Stono: Documenting and Interpreting a Southern Slave Revolt 7 Thursday, March 13: Library Day Use this day to conduct primary-source research in the library as appropriate to your needs as you prepare to write your Primary Source Analysis Paper and Final Research Paper. Keep in mind what you have learned during the class sessions on primary source research and analysis. March 15-March 22 Spring Break, Class does not meet 15Tuesday, March 25: Workshop Three Primary**Due at the beginning of class: Primary-Source Analysis Draft. Bring a copy for each person in your workshop group.** Thursday, March 27: Student Presentations (3) 27: Primary**Due at the beginning of class: Primary-Source Analysis Paper** Tuesday, April 1: Student Presentations (3) Thursday, April 3: Student Presentations (3) 3: Tuesday, April 8: Student Presentations (3) 8: Thursday, April 10: Discussion of Trouillot's Silencing the Past I Readings: Michel-Rolph Trouillot, Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History. Tuesday, April 15: Discussion of Trouillot's Silencing the Past II 15: Readings: Michel-Rolph Trouillot, Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History. Thursday, April 17: Workshop Four 17: Workshop **Due at the beginning of class: Final Paper Draft. Bring a copy for each person in your workshop group.** Tuesday, April 22: Research Paper Consultation Hours, 3:05pm-7:15pm 22: 3:05pmThis is an opportunity for you to consult with me on last-minute issues, doubts, concepts, and questions as you polish your final draft. Thursday, April 24: 24: 6pm **Final Paper due Thursday, April 24, by 6pm in my History Department mailbox** ...
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course HIST HIS3051 taught by Professor Bruey during the Spring '08 term at UNF.

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