FTFS Chap23 P001 - Chap 23 Heat Exchangers Chapter 23 HEAT...

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Unformatted text preview: Chap 23 Heat Exchangers Chapter 23 HEAT EXCHANGERS Types of Heat Exchangers 23-1C Heat exchangers are classified according to the flow type as parallel flow, counter flow, and cross- flow arrangement. In parallel flow, both the hot and cold fluids enter the heat exchanger at the same end and move in the same direction. In counter-flow, the hot and cold fluids enter the heat exchanger at opposite ends and flow in opposite direction. In cross-flow, the hot and cold fluid streams move perpendicular to each other. 23-2C In terms of construction type, heat exchangers are classified as compact, shell and tube and regenerative heat exchangers. Compact heat exchangers are specifically designed to obtain large heat transfer surface areas per unit volume. The large surface area in compact heat exchangers is obtained by attaching closely spaced thin plate or corrugated fins to the walls separating the two fluids. Shell and tube heat exchangers contain a large number of tubes packed in a shell with their axes parallel to that of the shell. Regenerative heat exchangers involve the alternate passage of the hot and cold fluid streams through the same flow area. In compact heat exchangers, the two fluids usually move perpendicular to each other. 23-3C A heat exchanger is classified as being compact if > 700 m 2 /m 3 or (200 ft 2 /ft 3 ) where is the ratio of the heat transfer surface area to its volume which is called the area density. The area density for double-pipe heat exchanger can not be in the order of 700. Therefore, it can not be classified as a compact heat exchanger. 23-4C In counter-flow heat exchangers, the hot and the cold fluids move parallel to each other but both enter the heat exchanger at opposite ends and flow in opposite direction. In cross-flow heat exchangers, the two fluids usually move perpendicular to each other. The cross-flow is said to be unmixed when the plate fins force the fluid to flow through a particular interfin spacing and prevent it from moving in the transverse direction. When the fluid is free to move in the transverse direction, the cross-flow is said to be mixed. 23-5C In the shell and tube exchangers, baffles are commonly placed in the shell to force the shell side fluid to flow across the shell to enhance heat transfer and to maintain uniform spacing between the tubes. Baffles disrupt the flow of fluid, and an increased pumping power will be needed to maintain flow. On the other hand, baffles eliminate dead spots and increase heat transfer rate. 23-1 Chap 23 Heat Exchangers 23-6C Using six-tube passes in a shell and tube heat exchanger increases the heat transfer surface area, and the rate of heat transfer increases. But it also increases the manufacturing costs....
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FTFS Chap23 P001 - Chap 23 Heat Exchangers Chapter 23 HEAT...

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