Test1 - Although history shows us that large cities have...

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Although history shows us that large cities have existed through the ages, great concern over how and why such cities developed was not widespread until the era of industrialization. Sociologists from nearly every modern country have debated and theorized about the origins of urban life, its differences from rural community life, and its effect on residents. Over time, a specific understanding of urban living has evolved; the term “urban” refers not only to the physical form of cities—from the Latin root of the word—but also to the spaces included in densely settled areas and the various city centers, people, and activities. In the early industrialization period, Ferdinand Toennies noticed a split between life centered on community in a small town or village ( Gemeinschaft ) and life more centered on detached social relations in a city ( Gesellschaft ). According to Toennies, a Gemeinschaft lifestyle was characterized by ties of kinship, social interdependence, and a sense of belonging in the community. Rural areas had central spaces and monuments, and wealth was measured in land and livestock. Gesellschaft living, however, had much more impersonal relations and a very different type of social interdependence. Cities had more advanced transportation methods, as well as a central business district instead of a town square. Large scale production was the
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course SOC 370 taught by Professor Ward during the Winter '08 term at BYU.

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Test1 - Although history shows us that large cities have...

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