Hurricane of 1886

Hurricane of 1886 - Ashley Morgan Extra Credit Paper 20...

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Unformatted text preview: Ashley Morgan Extra Credit Paper 20 April 2007 The Great Earthquake of 1886 According to Richard Cotes lecture at the Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum, Charleston experienced one of the most horrific natural disasters in the history of the United States. On August 31, 1886, the residents of South Carolina, had many things on their minds, but most likely not an earthquake. It was a very clear night in the city. The entire harbor looked like a sheet of glass. Then, at 9:51 PM, the most powerful earthquake ever to hit the East Coast struck South Carolina and devastated the city of Charleston. The city underwent extensive damage, but managed to almost fully reconstruct itself in about a year. The damage from the powerful earthquake left the city of Charleston in complete disarray. The entire population of the city was driven out of their homes and into the streets. Many building were completely destroyed by burst of seismic energy. Regardless of location or composition, every building in Charleston was damaged, leaving 40,000 people homeless. The composition, every building in Charleston was damaged, leaving 40,000 people homeless....
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This essay was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course PHYSICS 101 taught by Professor Agrest during the Spring '08 term at CofC.

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Hurricane of 1886 - Ashley Morgan Extra Credit Paper 20...

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