MENDOZA PRINCE IVAN D. STEM122 CRYSTALLINE AND AMORPHOUS SOLIDS GENERALCHEMISTRYII W1-converted.pdf

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Republic of the PhilippinesDepartment of EducationREGION IV-A CALABARZONSCHOOLS DIVISION OF BATANGASSENIOR HIGH SCHOOL IN MALVARPOBLACION, MALVAR, BATANGASLESSON ACTIVITY SHEET IN GENERAL CHEMISTRY IICRYSTALLINE AND AMORPHOUS SOLIDSName of Learner: Mendoza, Prince Ivan D.Grade Level:Grade 12Strand/Track:STEMSection:STEM122Date:March 5, 2022A. Background Information for LearnersSolids are characterized by an extended three-dimensional arrangement of atoms, ions, ormolecules in which the components are generally locked into their positions. The componentscan be arranged in a regular repeating three-dimensional array (a crystal lattice), which resultsin a crystalline solid, or more or less randomly to produce an amorphous solid.The constituents of a solid can be arranged in two general ways: they can form a regularrepeating three-dimensional structure called a crystal lattice, thus producing a crystalline solid,or they can aggregate with no particular order, in which case they form an amorphous solid(from the Greekámorphos,meaning“shapeless”).A solid interface is defined as a small number of atomic layers that separate two solids inintimate contact with one another, where the properties differ significantly from those of thebulk material it separates. Based on their crystal structures, solids can be classified into thefollowing categories:1. Crystalline solids2. Amorphous solidsCrystalline solids have well-defined edges and faces, diffract x-rays, and tend to have sharpmelting points. In contrast, amorphous solids have irregular or curved surfaces, do not givewell-resolved x-ray diffraction patterns, and melt over a wide range of temperatures.LAS 2Address: San Joaquin Road, Poblacion, Malvar, BatangasMobile No.: 09171601390
The table below shows the comparison of crystalline and amorphous solids.CRYSTALLINEAMORPHOUSCHARACTERISTICarranged in fixed geometricpatterns or lattices. Examples ofcrystalline solids are ice andsodium chloride (NaCl), coppersulfate (CuSO4), diamond, graphite,and sugar (C12H22O11). Theordered arrangement of their unitsmaximizes the space they occupyand are essentially incompressible.Amorphous solids have a randomorientation of particles. Examples ofamorphous solids are glass, plastic,coal, and rubber. They areconsidered super-cooled liquidswhere molecules are arranged in arandom manner similar to the liquidstate.NATURETrue Solids.PseudoSolids or supercooledliquids.GEOMETRYParticles are arranged in arepeating pattern. They have aregular and ordered arrangementresulting in a definite shape.Particles are arranged randomly.They do not have an orderedarrangement resulting in irregularshapes.

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Term
Fall
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Tags
Atom, Crystal, A Crystalline, C Crystalline

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