WA08_CHE-121-mar14 - Thomas Edison State College General...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

Thomas Edison State College General Chemistry I with Labs (CHE-121) Section no.: OL009 Semester and year: May Term Written Assignment 8: The Electronic Structure of Atoms Answer all assigned questions and problems, and show all work. 1. The blue color of the sky results from the scattering of sunlight by air molecules. The blue light has a frequency of about 7.5 × 10 14 Hz. (a) Calculate the wavelength, in nm, associated with this radiation, and (b) calculate the energy, in joules, of a single photon associated with this frequency. (8 points) (a) 2.998 x 10 8 / 7.5 x 10 14 x 1 nm / 10 -9 = 4.0 x 10 2 nm (b) 6.626 x 10 -34 x 7.5 x 10 14 = 5.0 x 10 -19 J (Reference: Chang 7.16) 2. (a) What is an energy level? Explain the difference between ground state and excited state. (b) What are emission spectra: How do line spectra differ from continuous spectra? (6 points) (a) An energy level is a specific area that electrons orbit near the nucleus. Ground and excited states are the extremes, which are the lowest and highest energy levels respectively. (b) Emission spectra are spectra of radiation. Line spectra differ from continuous spectra in that in that they emit only at particular wavelengths while continuous spectra cover all wavelengths. (Reference: Chang 7.23) 3. Explain the statement , Matter and radiation have “dual nature.” (3 points) The statement that matter and radiation have a dual nature is explained in that matter presents as both waves and particles. The more defined one aspect is the less defined the other becomes. (Reference: Chang 7.35) 1 Copyright © 2014 by Thomas Edison State College. All rights reserved.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

4. Which of the four quantum numbers ( n , ℓ, m , m s ) determine (a) the energy of an electron in a hydrogen atom and in a many-electron atom, (b) the size of an orbital, (c) the shape of an orbital, (d) the orientation of an orbital in space. (4 points) (a) m s . (b) n. (c) ℓ. (d) m ℓ.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern