Assignment 2.Essay

Assignment 2.Essay - Michael Snider HIST 2773 A1 100084926...

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Michael Snider HIST 2773 A1 100084926 December 7 th , 2007 The Rebellions of 1837 and 1838
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In 1837 and 1838, there were parallel but separate uprisings in Lower Canada, today’s Quebec, and Upper Canada, now Ontario. These were due to social and political conflicts between the Red-Coats and the Patriotes, which led to uprisings supported by the United States, that failed because of strong opposition and a divided leadership. The Upper Canada rebellion was caused American-born settlers who moved North prior to the war of 1812, and they were discontent with the network of officials who favoured the Church of England, and due to opposition over land-granting policies. The Lower Canada rebellion was a conflict with the French majority, who wanted centralized power in the elected Assembly, and the British minority, who resisted a French Canadian dominance. Both of these occurrences were an uprising against the power, and dominance of the British, even in a minority power in some areas, especially Lower Canada. Both attempts failed to completely uproot the government and the British control though, and because of this, they were rebellions. A rebellion and a revolution are two completely different events. Although they both stem from the same idea, the same hope, that of overthrowing the current power or government. But the real difference, the point that separates these two occurrences more then any other point, is the success. The word 2
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revolution comes from the Latin revolutio which literally means a turn-around 1 . Looking at famous revolutions in history, the French Revolution, the American Revolution, the Bolshevik Revolution, all these led to the overturning of power to the rebels. A revolution leads to a reformation of the government, a “turn- around”. And this is important because it changes the face of a nation. After the French Revolution, the monarchy was destroyed and the people took control,
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This essay was uploaded on 04/19/2008 for the course HIST 2773 taught by Professor Macdonald during the Fall '08 term at Acadia.

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Assignment 2.Essay - Michael Snider HIST 2773 A1 100084926...

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