4. Animal Structure and Function and Nutrition post

4. Animal Structure and Function and Nutrition post - Chap...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Chap 40 Animal Structure and Function What do all Animals have in Common? Certain processes are required for survival Acquire energy (food and oxygen) Dispose of waste products Regulate body conditions (water, pH, and temperature) Protection from predation Reproduction Tools Anatomy structure of an organism Physiology functions an organism performs Animal Size and Shape Physical laws determine size of an animal Nutrient availability Hydrodynamics Surface-to-volume ratio Multicellular animals consist of many cells Each cell must be bathed in an aqueous medium Plasma membrane is cells shipping and receiving Levels of Organization Multicellular animals Atoms, Molecules, and Cells (CHEM 111,112,221,222 and BIOL 111, 312, 401, 403) Tissues, Organs, and Organisms Animals (BIOL 112, 311) Plants (BIOL 213) Populations, Communities, and Ecosystems (BIOL 306) Tissues Group of cells with a common structure and function Types Epithelial Connective Nervous Muscle Epithelial Tissue Forms Membranous Sheets of tightly packed cells that line the body Serve as barriers Mechanical injury Microorganisms Fluid loss Apical surface (air or fluid); Basal surface (basement membrane) Glandular Absorb or secrete chemical solutions Epithelial Tissue Classification Number of cell layers Simple Stratified Pseudostratified Shape of cell on apical surface Squamous Cuboidal Columnar Types of Epithelia Tissue Simple Squamous Filters blood and gas exchange Blood vessels, lymph vessels, and lungs Simple Cuboidal Secretion and absorption Kidney tubules Simple Columnar Protection, secretion and absorption Lines uterus and digestive tract Stratified Squamous Protection Skin, mouth and throat, vagina, and anal canal Stratified Columnar Protection and secretion Urethra Pseudostratified Columnar Secretion and propulsion of mucus Respiratory and reproductive system Connective Tissue Bind and support other tissue Low number of cells in matrix (liquid, gelatinous, solid) Components Ground substance interstitial fluid and proteins Fibers Collagenous Collagen (most abundant protein in animal kingdom) Nonelastic and do not tear Elastic Elastin Reticular Collagen Form a tightly woven fabric that joins connective tissue to adjacent tissue Cells Fibroblast Macrophage Types of Connective Tissue Loose CT binds epithelia to keep it in place Fibrous CT dense made mostly of collagen (tendons and ligaments) Adipose stores fat and insulates Adipocytes Cartilage collagen fibers in jelly substance (chondroitin) Chondrocytes Bone mineralized CT Osteocytes Blood matrix is plasma Erythrocytes (RBCs) Leukocytes (WBCs) Platelets Nervous Tissue...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course BIOL 112 taught by Professor Maze during the Spring '08 term at Lander.

Page1 / 56

4. Animal Structure and Function and Nutrition post - Chap...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online