C1_presentation

C1_presentation - to probe the fundamental interactions at...

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Macroscopic Interactions Long-range (ex., gravity) Contact (tension, compression, friction)
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A ball swings back and forth on the end of a string. The ball interacts with the earth via the long-range gravitational interaction. The ball also interacts with the string. What is the type of macroscopic interaction between the ball and string? (A) A tension interaction (B) A compressive interaction (C) A friction interaction (D) An electrostatic interaction
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(C1R.4) Each part of this problem describes an object in a specific physical context in which it interacts with other objects. In each case, use the macroscopic interaction categories to list the ways that the object interacts with its surroundings; and for each listed interaction, state the other object involved. (A) A person sits on a chair. (B) A magnet sticks to the side of a refrigerator. (C) A car accelerates down a road.
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Fundamental Interactions Gravitational Electromagnetic Weak Nuclear force Strong Nuclear force
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In what important way(s) are the strong and weak nuclear interactions different from the electromagnetic and gravitational interactions?
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Powerful accelerators, like the one at Fermilab, are needed
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Unformatted text preview: to probe the fundamental interactions at tiny distance scales The 100-ton Collider Detector at Fermilab is used to analyze the debris from the collisions of protons and antiprotons moving at nearly the speed of light In the absence of interactions, the speed of an object will (A) increase. (B) decrease. (C) remain the same. Newtons First Law: Any object that does not interact with something else moves with a constant speed in a fixed direction . (C1T.9) A bicyclist rounds a curve at a constant speed. The bicyclists velocity is also constant. (T) True (F) False Suppose an object moves with a constant speed in a fixed direction. Can we conclude that it is not interacting with something else? A rock has a density of 2.85 g/cm 3 . Express the density of the rock in units of kg/m 3 . A particle travels at a speed of 60 kilometers per hour (60 km/hr). What is the particles speed in meters per second (m/s)? s m 7 . 16 s 3600 hr 1 km 1 m 1000 hr km 60 = 3 3 3 m kg 2850 m 1 cm 100 g 1000 kg 1 cm g 85 . 2 =...
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C1_presentation - to probe the fundamental interactions at...

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