C5_presentation

C5_presentation - (C5T.5 Two magnetic hockey pucks sliding...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
(C5T.5) Two magnetic hockey pucks sliding on a flat plane of frictionless ice attract each other, changing each other’s direction of motion as they pass. We can (or cannot) realistically apply conservation of momentum to this situation because (A) the system of interest floats in space . (B) the pucks are a functionally isolated system. (C) we can treat the interaction as a collision . (D) Conservation of momentum does not apply here.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2. (C5T.4) Two football players run into each other at midfield. We can (or cannot) realistically apply conservation of momentum to calculate the players’ velocities just after the impact because (A) the system of interest floats in space . (B) the pucks are a functionally isolated system. (C) we can treat the interaction as a collision . (D) Conservation of momentum does not apply here.
Background image of page 2
(C5B.6) Two hockey pucks, one with mass m and one with mass 3 m , slide on a flat, frictionless plane of ice. Originally the lighter puck is sliding westward at a speed of 2 m/s, while the other is sliding eastward at a speed of 1 m/s. The pucks collide and stick together. What is their joint velocity
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course PHYS 120 taught by Professor Decarlo during the Spring '08 term at DePauw.

Page1 / 9

C5_presentation - (C5T.5 Two magnetic hockey pucks sliding...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online