Final Study Guide

Final Study Guide - Final Exam Study Guide Astronomy 181...

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Final Exam Study Guide Astronomy 181 Lab 1.) Describe the relationship between an observer’s latitude and the altitude of Polaris above the Northern horizon. The altitude of Polaris at any given place is equivalent to the observer’s latitude 2.) How is the maximum altitude of the celestial equator related to the altitude of Polaris? The maximum altitude of the celestial equator is 90º - your latitude. The altitude of Polaris is equal to your latitude. Therefore, the maximum altitude of the celestial equator is 90º - the altitude of Polaris and vice versa. In other words, the maximum altitude of the celestial equator plus the altitude of Polaris is equal to 90. 3.) Sketch a celestial sphere and identify the locations of the north celestial pole, south celestial pole, the celestial equator and the ecliptic. 4.) Define the following terms a. Altitude – the angle of an object above the horizon b. Azimuth – the compass direction of a celestial object, measured from dew north, eastward along the horizon (N = 0º, E = 90º, S = 180º, W = 270º) c. Astronomical horizon – the theoretical horizon 90 degrees from the zenith (without trees, hills, etc) d. Zenith – the point on the sky located directly over head e. Meridian – the imaginary arc on the sky that starts at due north on the astronomical horizon, goes through the zenith, and stops at due south on the horizon 5.) How can the Big Dipper be used to find the North Star? Using the two pointer stars (the two stars in the Big dipper closest to the horizon) one can find the North Star. To do this one may draw an imaginary line between the two pointer stars and extend it upwards and to the right to locate Polaris. 6.) What is the altitude of Polaris in Flagstaff? ~35º (35.2º) 7.) Briefly describe how you find an object with the “Star and Planet Locator” First you must rotate the circle to match the date with the current time (for today, you would match Dec 11 on the outside wheel with the time of when you are observing on the inside). Next, you must hold the locator upside-down above your head and correlate the directions written on the locator with the actual directions (ie: if you’re facing north, make sure that the side on the locator labeled “north” is pointing straight ahead). From here, you locate the object you are looking for on the star locator, and you will be able to see where on the celestial sphere it is located at the current time. If you look in the direction indicated by the locator, you will be able to find the object you are looking for. 8.) Did the stars/constellations appear to move during the time that you spent outside, if so in what direction? Yes, they appeared to move. The stars were progressing toward the western horizon to set. 9.)
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This test prep was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course AST 181 taught by Professor Barlow during the Fall '07 term at N. Arizona.

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Final Study Guide - Final Exam Study Guide Astronomy 181...

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