WOH essay 1 - Kiah McSwain WOH 1030 Dr Anna Amundson 1272 words The Industrial Revolution Evidence provided from Ways of the World A Brief Global

WOH essay 1 - Kiah McSwain WOH 1030 Dr Anna Amundson 1272...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 6 pages.

Kiah McSwainWOH 1030Dr. Anna Amundson1/31/20161272 wordsThe Industrial RevolutionEvidence provided from Ways of the World: A Brief Global History with Sourcesby Robert Strayer and Eric Nelson supports the notion that the Industrial Revolution can indeed be called a revolution. To begin to provide support for this assertion, a revolution must first be defined. According to the Oxford English Dictionary the word “revolution” has two definitions. The first definition is: “an attempt to create change in a specific governmental rule or social order by an unusually large number of people accomplished through violent action.” As the Industrial Revolution did not require violent action to influence only governmental change, this definitionis not applicable. However, the second definition states that a revolution is a“great change in societal, religious, economical, and cultural aspects of a relatively large group of peoples’ lives”, which the Industrial Revolution displayed as it swept through Europe and the rest of the world. These “great changes” included the improved “wealth” of the empire and some of it’s patrons through colonization, the introduction of different societal classes, and technological advances influenced by the French Revolution and the Scientific Revolution. Massive migrations to European cities began the Industrial Revolution. However, such large migrations and rapid population growth
Background image
could not have been supported without the increased wealth and stability that the European empires of the time, mainly Britain, afforded. These empires underwent massive expansion in the years leading up to the Industrial Revolution through colonization and religious missionary efforts. For example, Britain acquired immense power over the world as a result of its subtle overtaking of parts of Asian, the Middle Eastern, and Africa via colonization and through religious conversions (often forced). Source 15.4,a seventeenth century art print named, MakingChristianity Chinese,originated from a Jesuit priest and represents Westerners attempt to ‘Christianize’ Chinese society. Though the spread of European religion did
Background image
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 6 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture