Class Notes - Introduction to the Bible Introduction to the...

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Unformatted text preview: Introduction to the Bible Introduction to the Bible 1 I. What meaning does the Bible have for Jews and Christians? Take some time and browse through Psalm 119 for a vivid expression of the devotion for sacred scripture, in this case for the Torah. The Jewish community’s experience of Scripture is tied to their identity as a people. For example, read Deuteronomy 6:1-9 (the ‘ Shema’ , ‘Hear…"). This passage has been taken up by Jews as expressing the central creed of their faith. It is recited twice a day and on special occasions. The text of the Shema is written by hand upon small leather (parchment) scrolls and placed on the doorpost ( muzzuzah: see below) of the home, and on the forehead for prayer ( tefillim : see below). The Christian community’s experience of Scripture is tied to Jesus Christ. Read Luke 24 for an example of how the early Christians re-read the ancient scriptures in the light of the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus. Later, this passage would come to mean the ways in which the believing community is nourished in its journey and mission: by the presence of Christ in scriptures, in the Eucharist, and in the community. There is a rich tradition of the scriptures in the liturgies of Jews and Christians. In fact, it was the initial use and re-use of these common writings for teaching and for use in liturgies that would give them their normative quality. Some examples of this are found in the weekly reading of the Torah (see above) in the Synagogue on the Sabbath and in Jewish daily prayer book, the Sidur. The Catholic Lectionary contains the daily and Sunday Mass readings, and the daily prayer book of the Liturgy of the Hours incorporates biblical readings and the praying of the psalms. The Second Vatican Council document, Dei Verbum , states that the Bible is "the soul of theology." Centuries earlier, the scholarly monk, Jerome, who was commissioned by Pope Damasus to write an official Latin translation of the Bible from its original Hebrew and Greek languages so that the Western Christians could understand it, commented in a letter than "Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ." The Bible expresses the religious experience of individuals and of a people that together testify to the reality of the one personal God acting in and through history. For believers, this experience called for a response of faith . This faith encompasses doubt and unbelief because it involves risk, and has public, moral and social-political implications. It involves an ongoing involves risk, and has public, moral and social-political implications....
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This note was uploaded on 04/19/2008 for the course RST 243 taught by Professor Rodriguez during the Spring '08 term at St. Thomas FL.

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Class Notes - Introduction to the Bible Introduction to the...

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