CAS100paper

CAS100paper - Erin Kinsella Prof Britton CAS 100 An...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Erin Kinsella Prof. Britton CAS 100 10/24/07 An Unaccompanied Monster An apparent theme in Mary Shelley’s, Frankenstein, is the need and vitality of companionship in one’s life. The two main characters, Victor Frankenstein and the monster, both share the desire for companionship in their lives. The difference between Frankenstein and his monster is that Victor was knowledgeable as to the essential presence of support from loved one’s in life. The monster, being left to learn the ways of the world by itself, knows nothing of what life would be like with someone to love or to be loved by. What Victor has in life and what the monster does not as far as companionship goes becomes the underlying cause for the plot of the story. Victor Frankenstein, like every other human being, had a history. His family life and his emotional attachments throughout his life played a significant role in his actions with his monster. As a boy, Victor was very close with his father and mother; nobody “could have [had] more tender parents” (Shelley 19). His two younger brothers were two of the most important people in his life. Elizabeth, his adopted sister, cousin, and eventually his wife was the most crucial female in his life. Henry Clerval was one of the most important companions that Victor ever had, for Victor was “never completely happy when Clerval was absent” (Shelley 22). Victor held his family very near and dear to his heart, Henry included. Yet, despite his love and affection for them, he longed for a thrill
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 4

CAS100paper - Erin Kinsella Prof Britton CAS 100 An...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online