Sociology Part 2 Lecture Notes - Sociology Lecture Notes Part 2 CHAPTER 5 Social Inequality Learning Objectives o Origins and nature of social

Sociology Part 2 Lecture Notes - Sociology Lecture Notes...

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Sociology Lecture Notes Part 2CHAPTER 5Social InequalityLearning ObjectivesoOrigins and nature of social inequalityoSelected relevant concepts oSocial inequality in CanadaoPerspectives on inequalityIntroductionDespite all the “talk” about equality, we live in a world of inequality (illustrations) & democracy. Sources of inequality (nature-nurture) and the sociological response Definition and DiscussionInequality: differential access to resources (wealth, prestige or power)Stratification: structured and hierarchical arrangement of people based on ascribed and achieve variablesInequality and stratification: relationshipImplications of inequality and stratificationRelevant Underlying Principles
A social phenomenon and not a reflection of individual differencesInteractive and reinforcing natureSustains and persists over generationsUniversal but in different formsIdeology defines and justifies inequalityConcepts and StructuresAscribed and achieved statusSocial mobility and types (horizontal, vertical, inter/intra generational)Open systems: flexible boundaries and mobility possibleClosed Systems: rigid boundaries with little or no provision for mobilityClass of origin and class of destinationOpen systems and types of equality; opportunities; conditions; outcomes (illustration)Systems of stratification; slavery; caste and classSocial Inequality in CanadaIs there social inequality in Canada? oYes, inequality is universal. Everywhere you gMyths and reality of social inequality in Canada: life chances and meritocracyolife chances come from Max Webers writingsaccess to social resources oMeritocracy: your ability to achieve somethingMerit alone might not take you all the wayCanadian Class Structures: Defining FeaturesHigh/upper class: highest concentration of wealth, power, and prestige oUpper: inherited, born into wealth (old money)2
oLower high class: first generation of wealth, new moneyMiddle Class: professionals oUpper and middle-middle class: doctors, professionals getting paid moreLower class: the working pooroMinimum wage PovertyThe politics of defining povertyMeasuring poverty: low-income cutoffoAbsolute PovertyoRelative PovertyWhy are some poor?Economic and structural factors Who are the poor?oSingle head of household/family: femaleoAboriginal communitiesoRecent immigrantsOther Dimensions of InequalityRegional dimensionoHaves and have not’soEqualization program IncomeWealthOccupationEducationRace/ethnicity/gender (ascribed variables)Consequences of InequalityRegional frictionEducation and povertyState of well-being3
oHealth, hardships, homelessness and povertyFunctionalist PerspectiveKingsley Davis and Wilbert MooreoDifferential functional necessity of stratificationStates some jobs are more important than others

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