Educational_Attainment_US_Census_2012 - Educational...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
U.S. Department of Commerce Economics and Statistics Administration U.S. CENSUS BUREAU Issued February 2012 P20-566 Current Population Reports By Camille L. Ryan and Julie Siebens Educational Attainment in the United States: 2009 Population Characteristics This report provides a portrait of educational attainment in the United States based on data collected in the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS) and the 2005–2009 ACS 5-year estimates. It also uses data from the Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) to the Current Population Survey (CPS) collected in 2009 and earlier, as well as monthly data from the CPS. Prior to 2007, U.S. Census Bureau reports on educa- tional attainment were based on data primarily from the CPS. 1 The ACS is now used as the main source of educational attainment data because it has a larger sample and provides more reliable statis- tics for small levels of geography. The report also provides estimates of educational attainment in the United States, including comparisons by demo- graphic characteristics such as age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Information about educational attainment among the native-born and foreign-born populations is included. This report also presents a geographic picture of educational attain- ment with estimates by region and state. Workers’ median earnings by educational attainment are also addressed, including differences by sex, race, and Hispanic origin, as well as unemployment rates by educational attainment. Historical data are included to present some general trends over time. 1 For information on the differences between the ACS and CPS estimates, see Comparison of ACS and ASEC Data on Educational Attainment: 2004, Washington, DC, U.S. Census Bureau, 2007, and accompanying tables and figures, available on the Census Bureau’s Web site at <www.census.gov/acs/www/Downloads /library/2007/2007_Scanniello_01.pdf>. HIGHLIGHTS In 2009, more than 4 out of 5 (85 per- cent) adults aged 25 and over reported having at least a high school diploma or its equivalent, while over 1 in 4 (28 percent) reported a bachelor’s degree or higher. This reflects more than a three-fold increase in high school attainment and more than a five-fold increase in college attainment since the Census Bureau first collected edu- cational attainment data in 1940. 2 A larger proportion of women than men had completed high school or more education. 3 A larger propor- tion of men had received at least a bachelor’s degree. However, because women 25 years old and over outnum- ber men aged 25 and over, the number of women with bachelor’s degrees is larger than the number of men with these degrees. Among people aged 25 to 34, the percentage of women with a bachelor’s degree or higher was 35 percent compared with 27 percent of men.
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern