CORPORATE WORK ETHICS (1) - CORPORATE WORK ETHICS ROBERT...

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CORPORATE WORK ETHICS
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ROBERT JACKALL Robert Jackall is a professor of Sociology & Public Affairs at Williams College; author of Image Makers: Advertising, Public Relations , and the Ethos of Advocacy (Chicago, 2000), Wild Cowboys: Urban Marauders & the Forces of Order (Harvard, 1997), and Street Stories: The World of Police Detectives (Harvard, 2005).
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Robert Jackall ran extensive interviews with managers and executives in several large corporations -- mainly, a large chemical factory & a large textile firm. He described his project as “simply an interpretative sociological analysis of the moral dimensions of managers’ work”. In other words, their work ethic . MORAL MAZES: BUREAUCRACY & MANAGERIAL WORK Harvard Business Review (1983)
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PROTESTANT WORK ETHIC – Secular asceticism The practice of workers in everyday life who approach their productive activity like monks serving God – seeking to discipline their human impulses & desires to God’s will through “restless, continuous, systemic work in a worldly calling” (Jackall).
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The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism by Max Weber Max Weber was a German economist and sociologist working in 1904 and 1905. He wrote that capitalism evolved when the Protestant ethic influenced large numbers of people to engage in work in the secular world, developing their own enterprises and engaging in trade and the accumulation of wealth for investment. In other words, the Protestant ethic was a force behind the unplanned and uncoordinated mass action that led to the development of capitalism. This idea is also known as "the Weber thesis".
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PURITAN ETHICS & CAPITALISM Weber argued that Puritan ethics and ideas influenced the development of capitalism. Now this seems to be a contradictory claim since religious devotion is usually accompanied by a rejection of worldly affairs – including the pursuit of wealth and possessions. Why was that not the case with Protestantism? He addresses this apparent paradox in his book. Weber defined the spirit of capitalism as the ideas and habits that favor the rational pursuit of economic gain. He claimed that the Protestant pattern of ceaseless work & ceaseless renunciation provided the economic & moral foundations for modern capitalism. This bourgeois ethic valued self-reliance, hard work, frugality & rational planning.
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According to the new Protestant religions - especially Calvinism -- an individual was religiously compelled to follow a secular vocation with as much zeal as possible.
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