Quality Gurus - WalterA.Shewhart WalterA. .

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Walter A. Shewhart Walter A. Shewhart was a statistician at Bell Labs during the 1920s and 1930s.  Shewhart studied randomness and recognized that variability existed in all  manufacturing processes. He developed quality control charts that are used to identify  whether the variability in the process is random or due to an assignable cause, such as  poor workers or miscalibrated machinery. He stressed that eliminating variability  improves quality. His work created the foundation for today’s statistical process control,  and he is often referred to as the “grandfather of quality control.” W. Edwards Deming W. Edwards Deming is often referred to as the “father of quality control.” He was a  statistics professor at New York University in the 1940s. After World War II, he assisted  many Japanese companies in improving quality. The Japanese regarded him so highly  that in 1951 they established the Deming Prize, an annual award given to firms that  demonstrate outstanding quality. It was almost 30 years before American businesses  began adopting Deming’s philosophy. A number of elements of Deming’s philosophy  depart from traditional notions of quality. The first is the role management should play in a company’s quality improvement effort. Historically, poor quality was blamed on  workers—on their lack of productivity, laziness, or carelessness. However, Deming  pointed out that only 15 percent of quality problems are actually due to worker error.  The remaining 85 percent are caused by processes and systems, including poor  management. Deming said that it is up to management to correct system problems and  create an environment that promotes quality and enables workers to achieve their full  potential. He believed that managers should drive out any fear employees have of  identifying quality problems and that numerical quotas should be eliminated. Proper  methods should be taught, and detecting and eliminating poor quality should be  everyone’s responsibility. Deming outlined his philosophy on quality in his famous “14  Points.” These points are principles that help guide companies in achieving quality  improvement. The principles are founded on the idea that upper management must  develop a commitment to quality and provide a system to support this commitment that  involves all employees and suppliers. Deming stressed that quality improvements  cannot happen without the organizational change that comes from upper management.
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