Ch. 13. Motivation - Ch 13 Motivation What makes people...

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Ch. 13: Motivation 03/29/2016 What makes people happiest and most productive at work? Is it money, benefits, opportunities for growth, interesting work, or something else altogether? And if people desire different things, how can a company keep everyone motivated? Those are the central questions that this chapter, which focuses on motivation, will address. After explaining the basics of motivation, we will examine the details of a number of different motivational theories – equity theory, expectancy theory, reinforcement theory, and goal-setting theory. Each theory gives the manager a unique perspective on how to motivate employees to do their very best. Extrinsic and Intrinsic Rewards o Extrinsic rewards Tangible and visible to others Given to employees contingent on performance of tasks or behaviors o Intrinsic rewards The natural rewards associated with performing a task or activity for its own sake Early Theories of Motivation o HERZBERG’S TWO FACTOR THEORY Hygiene Factors (EXPECTED, NOT a motivator) Money (although a big DE-motivator) Salary Security Status Relationships Working conditions Status MOTIVATORS
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Achievement Recognition Work itself Responsibility Advancement Growth o MCCLELLAND’S THEORY OF NEEDS High Achievers motivated by: Achievable standards (avoid too easy or too difficult) Delineated roles and responsibilities Concrete, timely feedback High Affiliators motivated by: Working with people they know and trust Great for/love teams High Power motivated by: Having an impact Being in charge Impressing those in power Beating competitors Greatest fear: being demoted or Best managers tend to be high Power/low Affiliation
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More than one motivator possible Motivators can change over time Contemporary Motivation Theories o EQUITY THEORY: Theory that states that people will be motivated when they perceive that they are being treated fairly.
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  • Spring '08
  • Passovoy
  • expectancy theory, reinforcement theory, Contemporary Motivation Theories

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