9781284079937_SLID_CH22 - Chapter 22 Understanding Aging...

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Chapter 22 Understanding Aging and Dying
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Understanding Aging and Dying Learning Objectives 1. Describe some of the biological changes that occur with aging. 2. Define aging, maximum life span, average life span, life expectancy, ageism, and gerontology. 3. Discuss some of the health and social issues that stem from the “graying” of the American population.
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Understanding Aging and Dying Learning Objectives (continued) 4. Briefly explain two major theories of aging processes. 5. Explain how undernutrition affects the aging process. 6. Describe some of the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. 7. Describe measures you can take while young to reduce the risk of dementia later in life.
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Understanding Aging and Dying Learning Objectives (continued) 8. Describe some of the causes of vision and hearing loss. 9. Describe several ways to reduce the risk of osteoporosis. 10. Discuss the stages of dying as described by Kübler-Ross.
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Understanding Aging and Dying Learning Objectives (continued) 11. Explain the role of the two documents that constitute advance directives. 12. Briefly define the terms physician-assisted suicide, hospice, and palliative care. 13. Describe steps you can take while young to help ensure a healthy old age.
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Understanding Aging and Dying America’s Aging Population How Long Can Human Beings Live? Theories of Aging Alzheimer’s Disease and Senile Dementia Parkinson’s Disease Osteoporosis Age-Related Vision Loss Age-Related Hearing Loss
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Understanding Aging and Dying Physical Exercise May Slow Aging Thinking About Aging End-of-Life Decisions Healthy Aging Depends on Healthy Lifestyle
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Understanding Aging and Dying Life expectancy in the U.S. in 2014 was 78.6. Caucasian men, 76.2 Caucasian women, 81.2 African American men, 70.7 African American women, 77.6 Between 1950 and 2009, life expectancy increased 10 years. To attain average or better than average life expectancy, healthy lifestyles and behaviors must be adopted while young.
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America’s Aging Population Aging Refers to the normal changes in body functions that occur after sexual maturity and continue until death. Maximum Life Span The theoretical (idealized) maximum number of years that individuals of a species can live; for humans, this is about 120 years.
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America’s Aging Population
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America’s Aging Population
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America’s Aging Population Life expectancy cannot be increased significantly by curing the major causes of death, such as heart disease and cancer. Slowing the aging processes can have a dramatic effect, allowing most people to live almost 60 years beyond age 50. The “graying” of America has caused social, medical, and economic problems.
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America’s Aging Population
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America’s Aging Population
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America’s Aging Population 80% of older Americans have at least one serious chronic medical condition.
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