Madame Bovary - Professor Theda Wrede English 3400 5...

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Professor Theda Wrede English 3400 5 February 2016 Stallman’s Quote on Flaubert’s Madame Bovary Robert Wooster Stallman wrote a critique on Madame Bovary explaining what gave the book value, or the lack of. In his critique he mentioned that the most important aspect is the analysis of the psychological motive of his characters. The plot takes second place to the reasons the characters do what they do. When analyzing Emma, he mentions how throughout the book her morality deteriorates, until the point of having no morals at all. He goes on to say how Madame Bovary attacks the foundations upon which relationships are built, and that it attacks our understanding of human nature. Flaubert being prosecuted had nothing to do with the book’s value, nor did the negative view of humankind throughout the book. Book critics criticize the book because the characters’ good and bad aspects cancel out each other, meaning that there is no triumph of good over evil, nor does good triumph over evil. There is no moral to this story, and there is no lesson to be learned. These points discussed by Stallman are easily agreed with. I believe Gustave Flaubert did not write Madame Bovary with the intent to show readers right from wrong, instead I conclude that he wrote the book to show how society was impacting the social classes in his lifetime. During the period that this novel was written there was a lot going on within the social classes. Flaubert being a realist, was drawn to the problems that came along with this change. He documented materialism and the social class opinions during this time in Madame Bovary . The Bourgeoisie were emerging, and this type of middle class ran society was intriguing to all of
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those who dwelled within it. Being a Bourgeoisie meant that you could succeed or fail. There was no real given status, and if they failed they would have to start completely over. Just like the
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