Lecture week 5 - Week 5 Lecture Notes Keywords(Chpt 9...

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Week 5 Lecture Notes Keywords (Chpt 9): Keywords (Chpt 10): Subsistence pattern (four types) ethnocentrism Social stratification kinship Egalitarian Monogamy vs. polygamy Polytheism vs. monotheism Polyandry vs. polygyny Cross-cultural taboos bilineal vs. unilineal descent Labor specialization matrilineal vs. patrilineal Sedentary exogamy vs. endogamy Generalized and balanced reciprocity parallel vs. cross cousins Balanced reciprocity vs. market system political organization (4 types) Redistribution consanguinal vs. fictive vs. affinal kin Caste Lecture: Chapter 9 discusses subsistence strategies, or how we get and use food. You probably already know that the rest of the world doesn’t always hop in a vehicle and head to their local Piggly Wiggly, Walmart, Publix, or Jewel. Nope, much of the world, especially the developing world, still relies on “old fashioned” food strategies. Your textbook discusses four main subsistence patterns: hunter-gatherer, horticulture, pastoralism, and agriculture. Hunter-gatherers are said to be food collectors, while horticulturalists, pastoralists, and agriculturalists are food producers. Although these patterns can occur together (they are not mutually exclusive), you should concentrate on learning the basics of each pattern, where they typically occur and why they occur. A great diagram for you is figure 9.1 in your textbook. In week 2, we read about human evolution, the fossil record suggests that anatomically modern Homo sapiens are about 300,000 years old. Looking at figure 9.8, you’ll notice that animal domestication began around 10-11,000 years ago, and plant domestication soon followed (9-10,000 years ago). According to the evidence so far, this
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