PSYC 215Lecture 6 - PSYC 215 Lecture 6 September 24th...

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PSYC 215 Lecture 6 September 24 th Motivation and Cognition: How do we think? Ex. He was looking for a house and was thinking about all the decisions he had to make to make his choice. How do you balance the characteristics that you want in a house? How do you choose? How do you take these decisions? The judgement is motivated by what you want and want you need. Naïve scientists: We are like the ideal scientists in our everyday life. We try to make the best judgements that we can. We are not very good though because we make mistakes all the time in our social decisions. You are trying to make decisions and trying to make sense of what is going on around us. Thinking is for doing How we think about a topic – e.g. how we evaluate evidence for some belief or hypothesis - depends on our motivation: Goals, fears, preferences Yes, sometimes we are like scientists, but most of the time we are just engaged in life. How we think about a subject is influenced by motivations. Choose the best person (e.g., as a roommate): – Person a = smart, competent, stable – Person b = funny, pleasant, moody Could engage in unlimited hypothesis generation: – Collect more information – is one healthier? – Consider various explanations – Why moody? – Work harder to form an integrated impression that makes sense of inconsistent information What information do you consider, and how hard do you think about it? You have to choose the best person for a specific situation. You have to choose between person A and B. How do you choose? Some researchers have pointed out that in order to make a decision, you could engage in unlimited hypothesis. We you get the info you could try to explain the fact (why us that person moody). You can’t simply make a snap judgement. What info do you consider and how hard do you consider it. How hard you think about things can play a big role in how you experience your everyday life. Theory of Lay Epistemics Can we identify broad principles of how motivations affect the way we think? Trying to organize all the theories, are there some basic principles that can apply to many motifs. ‘’How do regular people get about doing things.
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Theory of “Lay Epistemics 1. Need for closure 2. Desire for validity 3. Motive for specific conclusions 1) Need for Closure: The motive to have some answer on a topic (rather than uncertainty, confusion) Leads to “seizing and freezing”: rushing to judgment and not changing one’s mind – E.g., using first impressions & heuristics – E.g., paying attention to consistent information Eventually you have to make a decision, you can’t deal with the uncertainty and indecision. You have a need for closure. With any judgement we have to make, we will eventually want closure.
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