Unit2_Internet_Performance_Layering

Unit2_Internet_Performance_Layering - Unit 2 Internet...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Unit 2 Internet, Performance, and Protocol Layering Network Performance & Protocol Layering 2-1
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Unit 2: Outline 2.1 Internet Structure 2.2 Packet Loss and Delay 2.3 Throughput 2.4 Protocol Layering Network Performance & Protocol Layering 2-2
Image of page 2
Unit 2.1 Internet Structure Network Performance & Protocol Layering 2-3
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
What’s the Internet? millions of connected computing devices: hosts = end systems running network apps Home network Institutional network Mobile network Global ISP Regional ISP router PC server wireless laptop cellular handheld wired links access points ° communication links ± fiber, copper, radio, satellite ± transmission rate bandwidth ° routers: forward packets (chunks of data) Network Performance & Protocol Layering 2-4
Image of page 4
1-5 A closer look at network structure: network edge: applications and hosts ° access networks, physical media: wired, wireless communication links ° network core: ± interconnected routers ± network of networks Network Performance & Protocol Layering 2-5
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1-6 The network edge: end systems (hosts): run application programs e.g. Web, email at “edge of network” client/server peer-peer ° client/server model ± client host requests, receives service from always-on server ± e.g. Web browser/server; email client/server ° peer-peer model: ± minimal (or no) use of dedicated servers ± e.g. Skype, BitTorrent Network Performance & Protocol Layering 2-6
Image of page 6
1-7 Access networks Q: How to connect end systems to edge router? residential access nets institutional access networks (school, company) mobile access networks Keep in mind: bandwidth (bits per second) of access network? shared or dedicated? Network Performance & Protocol Layering 2-7
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
telephone network Internet home dial-up modem ISP modem (e.g., AOL) home PC central office ± Uses existing telephony infrastructure ± Home is connected to central office ± up to 56Kbps direct access to router (often less) ± Can’t surf and phone at same time: not “always on” Dial-up Modem Network Performance & Protocol Layering 2-8
Image of page 8
telephone network DSL modem home PC home phone Internet DSLAM Existing phone line: 0-4KHz phone; 4-50KHz upstream data; 50KHz-1MHz downstream data splitter central office Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) ± Also uses existing telephone infrastruture ± up to 1 Mbps upstream (today typically < 256 kbps) ± up to 8 Mbps downstream (today typically < 1 Mbps) ± dedicated physical line to telephone central office Network Performance & Protocol Layering 2-9
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Cable modems HFC: hybrid fiber coax asymmetric: up to 30Mbps downstream, 2 Mbps upstream network of cable and fiber attaches homes to ISP router homes share access to router deployment: available via cable TV companies Network Performance & Protocol Layering 2-10
Image of page 10
Cable Network Architecture: Overview home cable headend cable distribution network (simplified) Typically 500 to 5,000 homes Network Performance & Protocol Layering 2-11
Image of page 11

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Cable Network Architecture: Overview home cable headend cable distribution network (simplified) Network Performance & Protocol Layering 2-12
Image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern