Article Response 3 - live in wealthier areas The learning...

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Chelsea Burnette Article Response 3 Back to School, and to Widening Inequality In the article Back to School, and to Widening Inequality, Robert Reich discusses the unequal opportunities experienced by children and families based on their geographic location within their communities. In the United States, the neighborhood that a child grows up in can greatly affect the quality of education they are receiving. A large amount of the funding that goes into schools to pay teachers and get the supplies needed for students comes from local property taxes. In poorer areas where neighborhoods are constantly failing, there is not as much money going into schools unlike in wealthier areas close by. Because of this, the children living in these poor areas are experiencing a learning a gap due to a lack of resources, and are falling consistently behind. Reading Back to School, and to Widening Inequality helped me understand why children who grow up in poor neighborhoods have a harder time succeeding in school than children who
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Unformatted text preview: live in wealthier areas. The learning gap between wealthy and poor children should not be as high as it is today. I think children living in poor areas should have an equal opportunity to get the quality education that their peers living only a few minutes away have. Instead of wealthier parents investing solely in their child’s school so they can have a good education, it would be more beneficial for our society as a whole to be putting more money into the schools located in poor areas of the community where it is most needed. Because children that live in wealthier areas already have access to more resources, investing more money in the schools located in poor areas would provide those children with a fair chance at succeeding in the future. I feel like if professionals were more aware of the learning gap between children living in residentially segregated areas, they would begin trying to find realistic ways to help solve the problem instead of add to it....
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