GHRM - TN 8i Re-entry and Career Issues 2014-15

GHRM - TN 8i Re-entry and Career Issues 2014-15 - Chapter 8...

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Chapter 8 Re-entry and career issues
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We examine: The process of re-entry or repatriation Job-related issues Social factors, including family factors that affect re-entry and work adjustment Multinational responses to repatriate concerns Staff availability and career issues Return on investment (ROI) and knowledge transfer Designing a repatriation program Chapter Objectives
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Terms re-entry shock repatriates holding pattern kingpin ‘trailing’ partner ROI knowledge transfer mentor boundaryless career ‘protean’ career international itinerants repatriate knowledge and skills: market specific knowledge personal skills job-related management skills network knowledge general management capacity
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Being a trailing spouse during the expatriate’s international assignment constitutes a damaging gap in their employment history. Kingpin means expatriates’ position oversea. They have greater autonomy, a broader area of responsibility, a top management position and a prominent role in the local society. The boundaryless careerist is the highly qualified mobile professional who builds his career competencies and labor market value through transfers across boundaries. They are protean person who are self-directed, learn endlessly, and build their career competencies. International itinerant is person who is professional mangers who over their careers are employed for their ability, by at least two business organizations that are not related to each other, in at least two different countries. Terms
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Expatriation includes repatriation Figure 8-1
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Introduction As expatriates complete their assignments, firms are faced with organizing these returns in a more planned pattern that allows for a more strategic and effective use of the returning employees' experiences and insights. Re-entry into home country presents new challenges - so-called ‘re-entry shock’ (‘reverse culture shock’) MNE’s ability to attract future expatriates is affected by the manner that it handles repatriation.
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Repatriation activities and practices
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The Pre-departure MNEs assign home sponsors (or mentor) and hold them responsible for keeping the expatriate in touch with changing conditions in the home country. Web-based indices of relevant national, regional, industrial or firm websites may be provided. By creating this network (including media sites), the expatriate be able to keep up with the change in the home country. The systematic updating can contribute to reduce culture shock upon return. Repatriation process
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During assignment Home leaves, work related information exchanges, sponsor communications and a systematic pre-return orientation process can facilitate realistic expectations and ease the return.
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  • Spring '14
  • GHRM, home country, Repatriation, repatriation process, repatriates, repatriate role

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