human_behavior_organization

human_behavior_organization - Chapter 5 MOTIVATION Job...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–16. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 5 MOTIVATION
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Job performance is a given requirement in any organization. It is possible, however, if the ff. conditions are met: 1. The capacity to perform 2. The opportunity to perform 3. The willingness to perform
Image of page 2
WHAT IS MOTIVATION? Motivation may be defined as the process of activating behavior, sustaining it, and directing it toward a particular goal.
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Capacity to perform Willingness To perform Opportunity to perform JOB PERORMANCE FIGURE 15 DETERMINANTS OF JOB PERFORMANCE
Image of page 4
Figure 16 The process of work motivation Internal force Course of Action Certain Behavior Worker External Force Organizational Goal
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
KEY ELEMENTS OF MOTIVATION Intensity Direction Persistence
Image of page 6
Intensity - refers to the level of effort provided by the employee in the attempt to achieve the goal assigned to him. Direction - relates to what an individual chooses to do when he is confronted with a number of possible choices. Persistence- is a dimension of motivation which measures how long a person can maintain effort to achieve the organization's goals.
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
THEORIES OF MOTIVATION There are various theories relates to motivation. They may be classified as either content, or process theories. Content theories Hierarchy of needs Theory of Abraham Marlow ERG Theory of Clayton Alderfer Acquired needs Theory of David McClellan Two-factor Theory of Frederick Herzberg
Image of page 8
PROCESS THEORIES Expectancy Theory of Victor Broom Equity Theory of J. Stacey Adams Goal setting theory of Edwin A. Locke
Image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Hierarchy of Needs Theory Abraham Marlow forwarded the idea the human beings possess a hierarchy of five needs (physiological, safety, social, esteem, and self- actualization) such that as each need is substantially satisfied, the next need becomes dominant.
Image of page 10
Description of needs Physiological needs- which include hunger, theory, shelter, sex, and other bodily needs. Safety needs- which include security and protection from physical and emotional harm. Social needs- which include affection, belongingness, acceptance, and friendship.
Image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Esteem needs- which include internal esteem factors such as self, autonomy, and achievement, external esteem factors such as status, recognition, and attention. Self-actualization - refers to the drive to become what one is capable of becoming, which includes growth, achieving one's potential, potential, and self fulfillment.
Image of page 12
The ERG Theory the ERG theory is a need hierarchy theory of motivation that was developed by Clayton Alderfer. Sets of Needs 1. Existence 2. Relatedness 3. Growth
Image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Acquired Needs Theory Was develop as the result of a research made by David McClelland . 3 FUNDAMENTAL NEEDS Need for achievement- this refers to desire to do something better or more efficiently, to solve problems, or to master complex tasks; Need for affiliation- which refers to the desire to establish and maintain friendly and warm relations with others; and Need for power- which refers to the desire to control other, to influence their behavior, or to be responsible for others.
Image of page 14
His research findings consist of the ff: 1.
Image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 16
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern