2100_9November - ENVS 2100 Environment Culture 9th November...

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ENVS 2100 Environment & Culture 9 th November 2015
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Menu Announcements Housekeeping Timed writing Plumwood Next assignment Two things project
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Dualisms are logical because…
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Plumwood claims that western thought is based on a logic that divides the world into two categories, values one over the other, and uses this construction to dominate people and things that it places on one side of the equation.
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Plumwood – logic of dualism Dualism is “the construction of a devalued and sharply demarcated sphere of otherness.” (p 41) “(P)ower construes and constructs difference in terms of an inferior or alien realm.” (p 42) Value dualism (this is ‘better’ than that), but with power (often coercive) behind it (this makes it stick) and connects it to systems, as well as ideas.
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Plumwood writes that “(t)he set of interrelated and mutually reinforcing dualisms which permeate western culture forms a fault-line which runs through its entire conceptual system.” (p 42)
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This means that the logic of dualism is ideological (realm of ideas and power), systemic (institutionalized), and material (things human and non-human). These realms reinforce each other, and the logic of dualism becomes pervasive/hegemonic.
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Contrasting pairs culture reason male mind master freedom production subject self nature emotion female body (nature) slave necessity (nature) reproduction (nature) object other
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Plumwood points out that in these sets almost all of the ‘superior’
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