Movements and Meaning- Putting the Asian American Movement in Context

Movements and Meaning- Putting the Asian American Movement in Context

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1 Professor Victor Bascara Asian American Studies 40 15 November 2015 Movements and Meaning: Putting the Asian American Movement in Context “African American, Asian American, Chicano, Latino, and Native American students called for ethnic studies and open admissions under the slogan of self-determination. They fought for the right to determine their own futures. They believed that they could shape the course of history and define a “new consciousness.” (Amerasia, 3) History exists for us to learn from: our mistakes and our successes. History allows us to draw connections between events, to understand patterns and themes. We are able to apply this idea to the movements of history, especially focusing on the genealogies and legacies left by the movements. We are then able to perceive the affects that the genealogies and legacies have on following movements, identifying influencing factors and comparing and contrasting the movements. The students of San Francisco State College started a movement for a cause that they believed was worth fighting for; in doing so, they left a legacy that was pivotal in influencing other student movements on campus and in the community. The action that the students took obtained the power that so many unrepresented groups long for, paving the way for the right to self-determination, the right to make their futures purely their own. Kumu Hina brought the idea of self-determination to her people as well, with the lifestyle that she chose to live for herself as a transgender woman. Kumu Hina speaks out in a number of ways in regards to her sexuality, her teaching, her marriage and her culture, taking action to determine her own future and the future of her people. Both the students of San Francisco State College and Kumu
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2 Hina left behind genealogies and legacies for the movements that allowed for self- determination that we as a whole enjoy today. We are in control of our own futures, and it is
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