Exam2LearningGoals - Good luck everyone fg1 Describe the...

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Good luck everyone !!!!! fg1 Describe the various properties of proteins that can be used to separate them from each other and list separation techniques that make use of differences in these properties. TABLE 5-2 Protein Property Separation Technique Solubility: based on polar groups on protein’s surface; Inc as salt is added and is in low ion conc 1) Salting out - ions compete w/ proteins for solvent molecules; N H 4 ¿ 2 SO 4 ¿ (ammonium sulfate) precipitates Ionic charge: Proteins have negative and positive charges that bind to oppositely charged groups 1) Ion exchange chromatography - anion exchange w/ DEAE groups and cation exchange w/ CM groups; binding affinity depends on salts and pH 2) Electrophoresis - gel filtration; size, shape and electric charge dependent 3) Isoelectric focusing (IEF) - w/ electrophoresis proteins are directed by their p I (pH where protein has no net charge) Polarity: Non-polar patches on proteins are excluded from solvents 1) Hydrophobic interaction chromatography - column of hydrophobic groups (phenyl- or octyl-); interaction inc with high [salt] Size: Pore size of gels affects which, or how fast, proteins will pass through 1) Gel filtration chromatography - size dependent; larger molecules separate out faster, small molecules need more solvent to elute 2) SDS-PAGE - type of
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polyacrylamide gel; separates by molecular mass; boiled with proteins; used with IEF in 2D gel electrophoresis (sds vertical, IEF horizontal) Binding Specificity: Proteins bind tightly, but noncovalently, to specific molecules 1) Affinity chromatography - column has specific ligand that target protein attaches to the exam?? Best bet would be Beta sheets, Lactose, Sucrose, and almost guaranteed something to do with drawing the amino acids again.- how do you know for sure? For amino acids I would think you mainly just need to know which is polar, nonpolar, and charged Recognize polypeptide planes and correctly select what is included in the plane. Recognize anomeric carbons. Link to exam 2: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8V3kdHJmtM1cjlEUGdqTEpBaW8/view?ths=true Is number 8 really c? - Its because alpha helices hydrogen bonds bind n to n+4, so n in this case is Gln, and n+4 is Gly. We also have to remember to read it from N->C so you know that Gly is n+4 because it is the carbonyl oxygen. -To me, it seems like Gln is n+3 and not n+4. What am I not seeing? Why is the number sequence labeled 1-7 and then 1-7 again on the second half? -These people are counting wrong, it has to be LEU. Gln is ‘n’ + 4 not including Gln itself gets you to LEU NO im pretty sure it is, please show some explanation because I believe it is Gln, I will try finding and explanation online/textbook It is Leu because it is (n+4). So you count four from Gly which will give you Leu.
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